See also: japan, japán, and Japán

EnglishEdit

 
a satellite image showing Japan

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in English as Giapan in Richard Willes's 1577 The History of Travayle in the West and East Indies (cited in Peter C. Mancall's Travel Narratives from the Age of Discovery, pp. 156–57), translating a 19 February 1565 letter of the Portuguese Jesuit missionary Luís Fróis as "Of the Ilande of Giapan".

Derived from Dutch Japan or Portuguese Japão, from Malay Jepang, from Sinitic 日本, likely from an earlier stage of modern Cantonese 日本 (Jat6-bun2) or Min Nan 日本 (Ji̍t-pún), from Middle Chinese 日本 (MC ȵiɪt̚ puənX, “sun origin”). Compare also modern Mandarin 日本 (Rìběn), Japanese 日本 (Nippon, Nihon), Korean 일본(日本) (Ilbon), Vietnamese Nhật Bản (日本).

The earliest form of “Japan” in Europe was Marco Polo's Cipangu, from some form of synonymous Sinitic 日本國 ("nation of Japan").

PronunciationEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
Wikivoyage has an article on:

Wikivoyage

  • IPA(key): /dʒəˈpæn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æn

Proper nounEdit

Japan

  1. An island nation in the Pacific Ocean, located to the east of China and Korea.
    Synonyms: Jap., Jpn., Land of the Rising Sun, Japonia, Nihon, Nippon, Yamato, State of Japan
    • 1889 Jan., Oscar Wilde, The Decay of Lying: An Observation", The Nineteenth Century:
      Vivian: If you set a picture by Hokusai, or Hokkei, or any of the great native painters, beside a real Japanese gentleman or lady, you will see that there is not the slightest resemblance between them. The actual people who live in Japan are not unlike the general run of English people; that is to say, they are extremely commonplace, and have nothing curious or extraordinary about them. In fact the whole of Japan is a pure invention. There is no such country, there are no such people... if you desire to see a Japanese effect, you will not behave like a tourist and go to Tokio. On the contrary, you will stay at home and steep yourself in the work of certain Japanese artists, and then, when you have absorbed the spirit of their style, and caught their imaginative manner of vision, you will go some afternoon and sit in the Park or stroll down Piccadilly, and if you cannot see an absolutely Japanese effect there, you will not see it anywhere.
    • 1985 February, Steve Jobs, interview with David Sheff, Playboy:
      Japan’s very interesting. Some people think it copies things. I don’t think that anymore. I think what they do is reinvent things. They will get something that’s already been invented and study it until they thoroughly understand it. In some cases, they understand it better than the original inventor... That strategy works only when what they’re working with isn’t changing very much—the stereo industry and the automobile industry are two examples. When the target is moving quickly, they find it very difficult...
    • 2008 November 21, Graham Linehan, The IT Crowd, Season 3, Episode 1:
      Nolan: You do know Japan have expressed concern?
      Douglas: What, the whole country?
      Nolan: No, not the whole... Mr Yamamoto.
      Douglas: He's important, isn't he?
      Nolan: He's the major shareholder.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


AfrikaansEdit

 
Afrikaans Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia af

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch Japan, from Malay Jepang, from Sinitic 日本.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Japan

  1. Japan

DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch Japan or Portuguese Japão, from Malay Jepang, from Sinitic 日本.

Proper nounEdit

Japan

  1. Japan (An island nation in the Pacific Ocean)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay Jepang, from Chinese 日本.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Japan n

  1. Japan

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


FaroeseEdit

 
Faroese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fo

EtymologyEdit

From Danish Japan, from Dutch Japan or Portuguese Japão, from Malay Jepang, from Sinitic 日本.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Japan

  1. (geography) Japan (An island nation in the Pacific Ocean)

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch Japan or Portuguese Japão, from Malay Jepang, from Sinitic 日本.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Japan n (proper noun, genitive Japans or (optionally with an article) Japan)

  1. Japan (a country in East Asia)
    Synonym: Land der aufgehenden Sonne

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Japan” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Japan” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon
  • Japan” in Duden online
  •   Japan on the German Wikipedia.Wikipedia de

HausaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English Japan.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /(d)ʒà.pân/
    • (Standard Kano Hausa) IPA(key): [d͡ʒə̀.pâŋ]

Proper nounEdit

Jàpân f

  1. Japan (a country in Asia)

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch Japan or Portuguese Japão, from Malay Jepang, from Sinitic 日本.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Japan n

  1. Japan
    Ég fer til Japans.
    I'm going to Japan.
    Hvar er Japan staðsett á kortinu?
    Where is Japan located on the map?

See alsoEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

Japan

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ジャパン

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch Japan or Portuguese Japão, from Malay Jepang, from Sinitic 日本.

Proper nounEdit

Japan

  1. Japan

Related termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch Japan or Portuguese Japão, from Malay Jepang, from Sinitic 日本.

Proper nounEdit

Japan

  1. Japan

Related termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch Japan or Portuguese Japão, from Malay Jepang, from Sinitic 日本.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /jǎpaːn/
  • Hyphenation: Ja‧pan

Proper nounEdit

Jàpān m (Cyrillic spelling Ја̀па̄н)

  1. Japan

DeclensionEdit


SwahiliEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Japan

  1. Alternative form of Japani

SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch Japan or Portuguese Japão, from Malay Jepang, from Sinitic 日本.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Japan n (genitive Japans)

  1. Japan

See alsoEdit