See also: snít and šnit

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “These senses appear to have separate derivations. The volume sense is likely related to Proto-Germanic *snidaz, i.e. a a little, a bit.”

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

snit ‎(plural snits)

  1. A temper; a lack of patience; a bad mood.
    He's in a snit because he got passed over for promotion.
  2. A U.S. unit of volume for liquor equal to 2 jiggers, 3 U.S. fluid ounces, or 88.7 milliliters.
  3. (US, dialect) A beer chaser commonly served in three-ounce servings in highball or juice glasses with a Bloody Mary cocktail in the upper midwest states of United States including Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, and Illinois.
    The bartender served us each a snit with our Bloody Marys this morning.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit