See also: Patience

English edit

 
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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology edit

From Middle English pacience, from Old French pacience (modern French patience), from Latin patientia (suffering; endurance, patience), from patiens, present active participle of patior (suffer, experience, wait), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *peh₁- (to hurt). Displaced native Old English ġeþyld.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpeɪʃəns/
  • (file)

Noun edit

patience (usually uncountable, plural patiences)

  1. The quality of being patient.
    Musical perfection requires practice and a lot of patience.
    • 1944 September and October, A Former Pupil, “Some Memories of Crewe Works—I”, in Railway Magazine, page 283:
      The most surprising thing was to discover that each job had its little tricks, peculiarities that had been learned in the experience of years, and one of the really pleasing features was the unlimited patience and kindliness of the chargehands and fitters, who would go to great lengths to teach the budding engineer all they themselves knew.
  2. Any of various card games that can be played by one person. Called solitaire in the US and Canada.

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Descendants edit

  • Sranan Tongo: pasensi

Translations edit

Further reading edit

See also edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French pacience, borrowed from Latin patientia.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

patience f (plural patiences)

  1. patience
    Antonym: impatience

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Noun edit

patience

  1. Alternative form of pacience