Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in 1615. From French somnolent, from Old French sompnolent, subsequently from Latin somnolentus, Latin somnus ‎(sleep), Proto-Indo-European *swépnos, *súpnos ‎(dream), which both are derived from Proto-Indo-European *swep-.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

somnolent ‎(comparative more somnolent, superlative most somnolent)

  1. Drowsy or sleepy.
  2. (dated) Causing literal or figurative sleepiness; soporific.

TranslationsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sompnolent, from Latin somnolentus, derived from somnus ‎(sleep), from Proto-Indo-European *swépnos ‎(sleep”, “slumber).

AdjectiveEdit

somnolent m ‎(feminine singular somnolente, masculine plural somnolents, feminine plural somnolentes)

  1. drowsy (inclined to drowse)

VerbEdit

somnolent

  1. third-person plural present indicative of somnoler
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of somnoler

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