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See also: Son, són, søn, and sơn

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English sonn, sone, sun, sune, from Old English sunu (son), from Proto-Germanic *sunuz (son), from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús (son), from Proto-Indo-European *sewH- (to bear; give birth). Cognate with Scots son (son), Saterland Frisian Suun (son), West Frisian soan (son), Dutch zoon (son), Afrikaans seun (son), Low German sone, son (son), German Sohn (son), Danish søn (son), Swedish son (son), Icelandic sonur (son), Lithuanian sūnùs (son), Russian сын (syn, son), Avestan 𐬵𐬏𐬥𐬎𐬱 (hūnuš, son), Sanskrit सूनु (sūnú, son), Ancient Greek υἱύς (huiús), υἱός (huiós, son), Albanian çun (lad, boy, son), Armenian ուստր (ustr, son), Tocharian B soy, soṃśke (son).

NounEdit

 
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son (plural sons)

  1. One's male offspring.
    Before the birth of the man's child, he said: "I want a son, not a daughter."
  2. A male adopted person in relation to his adoption parents.
  3. A male person who has such a close relationship with an older or otherwise more authoritative person that he can be regarded as a son of the other person.
  4. A male person considered to have been significantly shaped by some external influence.
    He was a son of the mafia system.
  5. A male descendant.
    The pharaohs were believed to be sons of the Sun.
  6. A familiar address to a male person from an older or otherwise more authoritative person.
  7. (Britain, colloquial) An informal address to a friend or person of equal authority.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
HypernymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English sonen, sunen, from the noun (see above).

VerbEdit

son (third-person singular simple present sons, present participle sonning, simple past and past participle sonned)

  1. (transitive) To produce (i.e. bear, father, beget) a son.
    • 1997, Noel Polk, Outside the Southern Myth:
      I sonned a father who would not be sonned, [...]
  2. (transitive) To address (someone) as "son".
    • 2005, Jerry Flesher, Tomorrow I'll Miss You:
      “Don't 'son' me.” “I'm old enough to be your father,” he said with a dismissive wave of his hand.
    • 2014, Stuart A. McKeever, Becoming Joey Fizz:
      “Son—now's not the time, please.” “It's the perfect time—it's the best time fucking time I ever had. There's not gonna be another time, so don't son me, you bastard. [...]”

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sonus. Compare Daco-Romanian sun.

NounEdit

son n (plural sonuri)

  1. sound

Related termsEdit


AsturianEdit

AzeriEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic сон
Roman son
Perso-Arabic سون

NounEdit

son (definite accusative sonu, plural sonlar)

  1. end, ending

DeclensionEdit


CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin sum, from Classical Latin suum.

DeterminerEdit

son m (feminine sa, masculine plural sos, feminine plural ses)

  1. his, her, its
  2. their
  3. your (alluding to vostè or vostès)

Usage notesEdit

The use of son and the other possessive determiners is mostly archaic in the majority of dialects, with articulated possessive pronouns (e.g. el meu) mostly being used in their stead. However, mon, ton, and son are still widely used before certain nouns referring to family members and some affective nouns, such as amic, casa, and vida. Which nouns actually find use with the possessive determiners depends greatly on the locale.

The standard masculine plural form is sos, but sons can be found in some dialects.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Provençal, from Latin somnus, from Proto-Indo-European *swépnos.

NounEdit

son m (plural sons)

  1. sleep

NounEdit

son f (plural sons)

  1. sleepiness
Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


DanishEdit

VerbEdit

son

  1. imperative of sone

FaroeseEdit

FinnishEdit

ContractionEdit

son

  1. Contraction of se on "it is".

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin sonus.

NounEdit

son m (plural sons)

  1. sound
    Le son de ce piano est agréable.
    The sound of this piano is nice.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French son, from Old French son, from Vulgar Latin sum, a reduced/atonic variant of suus, suum, from Proto-Italic *sowos, from Proto-Indo-European *sewos, from *swé (self).

DeterminerEdit

son m (singular)

  1. (possessive) His, her, its (used to qualify masculine nouns and before a vowel).
    Elle a perdu son chapeau.
    She lost her hat.
    Il a perdu son chapeau.
    He lost his hat.
    J'aime son amie.
    I like her/his girlfriend.
    La décision a été prise pendant son absence.
    The decision was taken in his absence.
Related termsEdit
Possessee
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine
Possessor Singular First person mon1 ma mes
Second person ton1 ta tes
Third person son1 sa ses
Plural First person notre nos
Second person votre2 vos2
Third person leur leurs
1 Also used before the feminine adjectives and nouns beginning with a vowel or a mute h.
2 Also used for the singular polite form.

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin secundus. Cognate with Catalan segó. Doublet of second.

NounEdit

son m (plural sons)

  1. bran
    Ceci est du pain de son.
    This bread is done with bran.

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sonus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

son m (plural sons)

  1. sound

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

son

  1. inflection of ser:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. third-person plural present indicative

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

son

  1. Alternative form of so'n
    • 1857, Der Glücksstern. Novelle von Julie Burow (Frau Pfannenschmidt), Bromberg, page 95:
      „[...] Macht Platz Leute! en Wagen wär' so übel nicht in soner Hitze.“

Further readingEdit

  • son in Duden online

IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

son

  1. indefinite accusative singular of sonur

IrishEdit

NounEdit

son

  1. Only used in ar son

IstriotEdit

VerbEdit

son

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ièsi
  2. second-person singular present indicative of ièsi
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 29:
      Ti son la manduleîna inzucherada.
      You are the sugared almond.

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

son

  1. Rōmaji transcription of そん

LadinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

son

  1. first-person singular present indicative of ester

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

son

  1. third-person singular present indicative of ester

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

son

  1. rafsi of sonci.

Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

son m

  1. (archaic) swan (waterfowl of genus Cygnus)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


ManxEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PrepositionEdit

son

  1. for
    Cur booise da Jee son dty hlaynt.
    Thank God for your health.
    Eeckee oo son shen.
    You'll pay for that.
    C're vees ain son jinnair?
    What shall we have for dinner?
  2. by
    Dy cadjin ta mee ec y thie son queig er y chlag.
    I'm usually home by five o'clock.
  3. (used with verbal noun) want
    Cha nel ee son credjal yn irriney.
    She doesn't want to believe the truth.
    Cha nel eh son poosey.
    He's not the marrying kind.
    As myr shen, bee oo son gee?
    You'll be wanting to eat, then?

Usage notesEdit

Not used with pronouns. See er son for inflected forms.

Derived termsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French son.

NounEdit

son m (plural sons)

  1. sound

DescendantsEdit


Northern SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Samic *sonë.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

PronounEdit

son

  1. he, she, it

InflectionEdit

Inflection of son (irregular)
Nominative son
Genitive
Nominative son
Genitive
Accusative
Illative sutnje
Locative sūs
Comitative suinna
Essive sūnin

See alsoEdit

Personal pronouns
singular dual plural
1st person mun moai mii
2nd person don doai dii
3rd person son soai sii

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sonr, from Proto-Germanic *sunuz, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús.

NounEdit

son m (definite singular sonen, indefinite plural søner, definite plural sønene)

  1. a son
    Han hadde to søner.
    He had two sons.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • soun (Anglo-Norman)
  • sun (Anglo-Norman)

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin sum, a reduced/atonic variant of Latin suus.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

son m (feminine sa, plural ses)

  1. his/hers/its (third-person singular possessive)

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle French: son

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin sonus.

NounEdit

son m

  1. sound

InflectionEdit

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative son sonL suinL
Vocative suin sonL sunu
Accusative sonN sonL sunu
Genitive suinL son sonN
Dative sunL sonaib sonaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

ReferencesEdit

  • son” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Old SwedishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sonr, from Proto-Germanic *sunuz.

NounEdit

son m

  1. son

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English sunu (son), from Proto-Germanic *sunuz (son), from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús (son), from *sewH- (to bear, give birth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

son (plural sons)

  1. son, male child

Derived termsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

son m (indeclinable)

  1. sake, account
    Dèan seo air ar son.
    Do this for our sake.

Derived termsEdit


Skolt SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Samic *sonë.

PronounEdit

son

  1. he, she, it

InflectionEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin sonus.

NounEdit

son m (plural sones)

  1. A pleasant sound, tone
  2. An Afro-Cuban musical form.
  3. A musical composition in this form.

Etymology 2Edit

See ser

VerbEdit

son

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present indicative form of ser.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present indicative form of ser.

Sranan TongoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch zon, from Middle Dutch sonne (sun), from Old Dutch sunna, from Proto-Germanic *sunnǭ, from Proto-Indo-European *sh₂un-, *sóh₂wl̥.

NounEdit

son

  1. sun

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish son, sun, from Old Norse sonr, sunr from Proto-Germanic *sunuz, from Proto-Indo-European *suHnús. Masculine in Late Modern Swedish.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

son c

  1. son; someone's male child
  2. definite singular of so

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic [script needed] (soŋ), from Proto-Turkic [Term?].

AdjectiveEdit

son

  1. last, final

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

son (definite accusative sonu, plural sonlar)

  1. end, ending
    Mutlu sonum.I am the happy ending.
    (pronunciation on the first syllable: sonum)
    Mutlu sonumMy happy ending
    (pronunciation on the last syllable: sonum)

DeclensionEdit


UzbekEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

son (plural sonlar)

  1. thigh

VenetianEdit

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

son

  1. unshakable; firm
    Lòng son dạ sắt càng thêm
    Lòng đà trăng gió ai tìm thấy ai.

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

son

  1. lipstick

Derived termsEdit


VolapükEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

son (plural sons)

  1. son

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


ZhuangEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Tai *soːlᴬ (to teach). Cognate with Thai สอน (sɔ̌ɔn), Lao ສອນ (sǭn), ᦉᦸᧃ (ṡoan), Tai Dam ꪎꪮꪙ, Shan သွၼ် (soan1), Ahom 𑜏𑜨𑜃𑜫 (son).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /θoːn˨˦/
  • Tone numbers: son1
  • Hyphenation: son

VerbEdit

son (old orthography son)

  1. to teach