sorites

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin sōrītēs, from the Ancient Greek σωρείτης (sōreítēs, fallacy of the heap), from σωρός (sōrós, heap).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sorites (plural sorites)

  1. (logic, rhetoric) A series of propositions whereby each conclusion is taken as the subject of the next.
    • 1760, Laurence Sterne, The Life & Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, Penguin 2003, p. 130:
      Why?—he would ask, making use of the sorites or syllogism of Zeno and Chrysippus without knowing it belonged to them.—Why? why are we a ruined people?—Because we are corrupted.——Whence is it, dear Sir, that we are corrupted?—Because we are needy [...] ——And wherefore, he would add,—are we needy?——From the neglect, he would answer

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek σωρείτης (sōreítēs, fallacy of the heap), from σωρός (sōrós, heap).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sōrītēs m (genitive sōrītae); first declension

  1. sorites; a logical sophism formed by an accumulation of arguments

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun (masculine Greek-type with nominative singular in -ēs).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative sōrītēs sōrītae
Genitive sōrītae sōrītārum
Dative sōrītae sōrītīs
Accusative sōrītēn sōrītās
Ablative sōrītē sōrītīs
Vocative sōrītē sōrītae

DescendantsEdit

  • English: sorites

ReferencesEdit

  • sorites in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sorites in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sorites in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette