series

See also: séries and seríes

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin series, from serere (to join together, bind).

PronunciationEdit

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Wikipedia

NounEdit

series (plural series)

  1. A number of things that follow on one after the other or are connected one after the other.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, The China Governess[1]:
      When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him. […]. The captive made no resistance and came not only quietly but in a series of eager little rushes like a timid dog on a choke chain.
    • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, “Our banks are out of control”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21: 
      Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. When a series of bank failures made this impossible, there was widespread anger, leading to the public humiliation of symbolic figures.
    A series of seemingly inconsequential events led cumulatively to the fall of the company.
  2. (US, Canada) A television or radio program which consists of several episodes that are broadcast in regular intervals
    Friends was one of the most successful television series in recent years.
  3. (UK) A group of episodes of a television or radio program broadcast in regular intervals with a long break between each group, usually with one year between the beginning of each.
    The third series of Friends aired from 1996 to 1997.
  4. (mathematics) The sum of the terms of a sequence.
    The harmonic series has been much studied.
  5. (cricket, baseball) A group of matches between two sides, with the aim being to win more matches than the opposition.
    The Blue Jays are playing the Yankees in a four-game series.
  6. (biology) An unranked taxon.

Usage notesEdit

  • In the United Kingdom, television and radio programs (spelt in Commonwealth English as "programmes") are divided into series, which are usually a year long. In North America, the word "series" is a synonym of "program", and programs are divided into year-long seasons.
  • (mathematics): Beginning students often confuse series with sequence.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

series (not comparable)

A series circuit
  1. (electronics) Connected one after the other in a circuit.
    You have to connect the lights in series for them to work properly.

AntonymsEdit

External linksEdit



CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

series

  1. Second-person singular conditional form of ser.

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

series f pl

  1. Plural form of serie

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

seriēs f (genitive seriēī); fifth declension

  1. a row
  2. a succession
  3. a series
  4. a chain

InflectionEdit

Fifth declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative seriēs seriēs
genitive seriēī seriērum
dative seriēī seriēbus
accusative seriem seriēs
ablative seriē seriēbus
vocative seriēs seriēs

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

series

  1. indefinite genitive singular of serie
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 11:38