See also: séries, seríes, sériés, and sèries

English

edit

Etymology

edit

Attested from the 1610s;[1] borrowed from Latin seriēs, from serere (to join together, bind), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ser- (to bind, put together, to line up). Related to desert, insert, sermon, and sorcerer.

Pronunciation

edit
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Noun

edit

series (plural series or (obsolete) serieses)

  1. A number of things that follow on one after the other or are connected one after the other.
    Synonyms: chain, line, sequence, stream, succession; see also Thesaurus:sequence
    A series of seemingly inconsequential events led cumulatively to the fall of the company.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, in The China Governess: A Mystery, London: Chatto & Windus, →OCLC:
      When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him. []. The captive made no resistance and came not only quietly but in a series of eager little rushes like a timid dog on a choke chain.
    • 2013 June 28, Joris Luyendijk, “Our banks are out of control”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 3, page 21:
      Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. When a series of bank failures made this impossible, there was widespread anger, leading to the public humiliation of symbolic figures.
  2. (broadcasting) A television or radio program which consists of several episodes that are broadcast in regular intervals
    Synonyms: show, program, season (North American English, Australian English)
    “Friends” was one of the most successful television series in recent years.
  3. (Discuss(+) this sense) (mathematics) The sequence of partial sums   of a given sequence ai.
    The harmonic series has been much studied.
  4. (cricket, baseball) A group of matches between two sides, with the aim being to win more matches than the opposition.
    The Blue Jays are playing the Yankees in a four-game series.
  5. (zoology) An unranked taxon.
  6. (botany) A subdivision of a genus, a taxonomic rank below that of section (and subsection) but above that of species.
  7. (commerce) A parcel of rough diamonds of assorted qualities.
  8. (phonology) A set of consonants that share a particular phonetic or phonological feature.

Usage notes

edit
  • (broadcasting): In North American English, a year-long group of episodes of a television or radio show is called a season, whereas the word series is a synonym of program or show.
  • (mathematics): Beginning students often confuse series with sequence.

Synonyms

edit

Derived terms

edit
all terms
mathematics
edit

Descendants

edit
  • Japanese: シリーズ (shirīzu)
  • Korean: 시리즈 (sirijeu)
  • Burmese: စီးရီး (ci:ri:)

Translations

edit
 
A series circuit

References

edit
  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024) “series”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Further reading

edit

Anagrams

edit

Asturian

edit

Noun

edit

series

  1. plural of serie

Catalan

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Verb

edit

series

  1. second-person singular conditional of ser
  2. second-person singular conditional of ésser

Dutch

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

series

  1. plural of serie

Interlingua

edit

Noun

edit

series

  1. plural of serie

Latin

edit

Etymology

edit

From serō (to bind) +‎ -iēs.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

seriēs f (genitive seriēī); fifth declension

  1. a row
  2. a succession
  3. a series
  4. a chain

Declension

edit

Fifth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative seriēs seriēs
Genitive seriēī seriērum
Dative seriēī seriēbus
Accusative seriem seriēs
Ablative seriē seriēbus
Vocative seriēs seriēs

Descendants

edit

References

edit
  • series”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • series”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • series in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • series in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Portuguese

edit

Verb

edit

series

  1. second-person singular present subjunctive of seriar

Spanish

edit

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): /ˈseɾjes/ [ˈse.ɾjes]
  • Rhymes: -eɾjes
  • Syllabification: se‧ries

Etymology 1

edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

edit

series f pl

  1. plural of serie

Etymology 2

edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

edit

series

  1. second-person singular present subjunctive of seriar

Swedish

edit

Noun

edit

series

  1. indefinite genitive singular of serie

series c

  1. Obsolete form of serie.