See also: Spang and spång

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English spang (a small piece of ornamental metal; spangle; small ornament; a bowl or cup), likely from Middle Dutch spange (buckle, clasp) or Old English spang (buckle, clasp).

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

NounEdit

spang (plural spangs)

  1. (obsolete) A shiny ornament or object; a spangle

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

spang (third-person singular simple present spangs, present participle spanging, simple past and past participle spanged)

  1. To set with bright points: star or spangle.
  2. To hitch; fasten.

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeic.

VerbEdit

spang (third-person singular simple present spangs, present participle spanging, simple past and past participle spanged)

  1. (intransitive, of a flying object such as a bullet) To strike or ricochet with a loud report

AdverbEdit

spang (not comparable)

  1. (dated) Suddenly; slap, smack.
    • 1936, Djuna Barnes, Nightwood, Faber & Faber 2007, p. 22:
      And I didn't stop until I found myself spang in the middle of the Musée de Cluny, clutching the rack.

Etymology 3Edit

Probably from spring (verb) or spank (verb) (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?)

VerbEdit

spang (third-person singular simple present spangs, present participle spanging, simple past and past participle spanged)

  1. (intransitive, dialect, Britain, Scotland) To leap; spring.
    • a. 1758, Allan Ramsay, epistle to Robert Yarde
      But when they spang o'er reason's fence, / We smart for't at our own expense.
  2. (transitive, dialect, Britain, Scotland) To cause to spring; set forcibly in motion; throw with violence.

NounEdit

spang (plural spangs)

  1. (Scotland) A bound or spring; a leap.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)

Etymology 4Edit

See span

NounEdit

spang (plural spangs)

  1. (Scotland) A span.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse spǫng, cf. Swedish spång. See also German Spange (clasp). Probably related to span from Proto-Germanic *spannaną.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [spɑ́ŋː], [spɒ́ŋː] (example of pronunciation)
    Rhymes: -áŋɡ

NounEdit

spang f (definite singular spanga, plural spinger, definite plural spingren)

  1. a simple one-man bridge, log bridge, footbridge[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Rietz, Johan Ernst, “spang”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 654