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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain. Eventually probably of imitative origin, but possibly old; compare Low German Slappe (slap), whence also German Schlappe (defeat).

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -æp
  • (file)

NounEdit

slap (countable and uncountable, plural slaps)

  1. (countable) A blow, especially one given with the open hand, or with something broad and flat.
  2. (countable) The sound of such a blow.
    • 2019 August 15, Bob Stanley, “'Groovy, groovy, groovy': listening to Woodstock 50 years on – all 38 discs”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Havens goes into the terrific Freedom for an encore, which will turn out to be a highlight of the movie; its chopped guitar and conga slaps pre-empt late 90s R&B.
  3. (slang, uncountable) Makeup; cosmetics.

Usage notesEdit

Especially used of blows to the face (aggressive), buttocks, and hand, frequently as a sign of reproach. Conversely, used of friendly strikes to the back, as a sign of camaraderie.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

slap (third-person singular simple present slaps, present participle slapping, simple past and past participle slapped)

  1. (transitive) To give a slap to.
    She slapped him in response to the insult.
    • 1922, Virginia Woolf, Jacob's Room Chapter 1
      Mrs. Flanders rose, slapped her coat this side and that to get the sand off, and picked up her black parasol.
  2. (transitive) To cause something to strike soundly.
    He slapped the reins against the horse's back.
  3. (intransitive) To strike soundly against something.
    The rain slapped against the window-panes.
  4. (intransitive, slang, of songs) To be excellent.
    Their new single slaps.
  5. (transitive) To place, to put carelessly.
    We'd better slap some fresh paint on that wall.
    • 2018 "The Secret Ceramics Room of Secrets", Bob's Burgers
      Louise Belcher: "On Monday there was supposed to be some big schoolboard inspection or something, so instead of cleaning the place up, what does the principal do? He panics. He and the janitor and the janitor's brother slap a wall where the door used to be."
      Gene Belcher: "Wall slap."
  6. (transitive, informal, figuratively) To impose a penalty, etc. on (someone).
    I was slapped with a parking fine.
  7. (transitive, informal) To play slap bass on (an instrument).
    • 2007, Jon Paulien, The Gospel from Patmos
      With no drums, Black began slapping his bass to keep time while Moore's guitar leaped in and out of the melody line.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

slap (not comparable)

  1. Exactly, precisely
    He tossed the file down slap in the middle of the table.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German slap

AdjectiveEdit

slap

  1. loose
  2. limp
  3. slack
  4. flaccid
  5. lax
InflectionEdit
Inflection of slap
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular slap slappere slappest2
Neuter singular slapt slappere slappest2
Plural slappe slappere slappest2
Definite attributive1 slappe slappere slappeste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

slap

  1. past tense of slippe

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch slap. Cognate with German schlaff and schlapp.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

slap (comparative slapper, superlative slapst)

  1. slack
  2. weak

InflectionEdit

Inflection of slap
uninflected slap
inflected slappe
comparative slapper
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial slap slapper het slapst
het slapste
indefinite m./f. sing. slappe slappere slapste
n. sing. slap slapper slapste
plural slappe slappere slapste
definite slappe slappere slapste
partitive slaps slappers

AnagramsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *slēpaz. Compare Old English slǣp, Old High German slāf.

NounEdit

slāp m

  1. sleep

DeclensionEdit



ScotsEdit

NounEdit

slap (plural slaps)

  1. A gap in a fence.
  2. A narrow cleft between hills.

VerbEdit

slap

  1. (transitive) To break an opening in.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *solpъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slȃp m (Cyrillic spelling сла̑п)

  1. (geology) waterfall

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • slap” in Hrvatski jezični portal

SloveneEdit

 
Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *solpъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slȃp m inan

  1. (geology) waterfall

InflectionEdit

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. sláp
gen. sing. slápa
singular dual plural
nominative sláp slápa slápi
accusative sláp slápa slápe
genitive slápa slápov slápov
dative slápu slápoma slápom
locative slápu slápih slápih
instrumental slápom slápoma slápi
Masculine inan., hard o-stem, mobile accent, plural in -ôv-
nom. sing. sláp
gen. sing. slapú
singular dual plural
nominative sláp slapôva slapôvi
accusative sláp slapôva slapôve
genitive slapú slapôv slapôv
dative slápu slapôvoma slapôvom
locative slápu slapôvih slapôvih
instrumental slápom slapôvoma slapôvi

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

slap m (plural slaps)

  1. (Peru) flip-flop, thong (Australia), jandal (New Zealand)

SynonymsEdit