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EtymologyEdit

 
An illustration of a steatopygous San woman[n 1]

From steatopyga, steatopygia +‎ -ous. Steatopyga is borrowed from New Latin steatopyga, from Ancient Greek στέᾱτος (stéātos) (genitive singular of στέαρ (stéar, hard fat, suet, tallow)) + πῡγή (pūgḗ, buttocks, rump).[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

steatopygous (comparative more steatopygous, superlative most steatopygous)

  1. (physiology) Pertaining to steatopygia; having fat or prominent buttocks.
    Synonyms: steatopygial, steatopygic
    • 1837, James Cowles Prichard, “Concluding Observations on the Physical Characters of the African Nations, on Their Relation to the Climate of Africa, and on Their Constancy or Liability to Variation”, in Researches into the Physical History of Mankind, volume II (Containing Researches into the Physical Ethnography of the African Races), 3rd edition, London: Sherwood, Gilbert, and Piper, []; and J. and A. Arch, [], OCLC 425922827, section I, page 339:
      [W]e may refer to some unknown condition of climate, the steatopygous deformities of the Bushmen. As these remarkable depositions of fat are not the peculiarity of one tribe, namely the Saabs, [] we have no room for doubt that the cause of the phenomenon is some influence connected with climate and situation.
    • 1855, Richard F[rancis] Burton, “The Nile Steam Boat”, in Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to Al-Madinah and Meccah. [...] In Three Volumes, volume I (El-Misr), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 973592864, page 87:
      Living in rooms opposite these slave girls, and seeing them at all hours of the day and night, I had frequent opportunities of studying them. They were average specimens of the steatopygous Abyssinian breed, broad-shouldered, thin-flanked, fine-limbed, and with haunches of prodigious size.
    • 1963, Anthony Burgess, chapter 2, in Inside Mr. Enderby, London: Heinemann, OCLC 435147; republished as Enderby, New York, N.Y.: Ballantine Books, September 1969 (March 1973 printing), OCLC 802999982, book II, section 4, page 160:
      Perhaps, he now felt, if this body he held could become—just for twenty or thirty seconds—one of those harem dreams of his, pampered, pouting, perfumed, steatopygous, he could, he was sure, achieve what it was a plain duty, apart from all questions of gratification, to achieve.
    • 1981, T[homas] Coraghessan Boyle, “Niger Redux”, in Water Music, Boston, Mass.: Little, Brown, →ISBN; republished London: Granta Books, 1998, →ISBN, page 341:
      At his side, Amuta and a steatopygous twelve-year-old in a striped shift.

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  1. ^ From [Louis-Joseph] A[lcide] Railliet (1895) Traité de zoologie médicale et agricole [Treatise of Medical and Agricultural Zoology], Paris: Asselin et Houzeau, OCLC 848804698, page 1244.

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