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See also: Fat, FAT, fát, fāt, făt, fät, and Fät

Contents

EnglishEdit

 FAT on Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
A fat cat

From Middle English fat, from Old English fǣtt (fatted, fat), from Proto-Germanic *faitidaz (fatted), originally the past participle of the verb *faitijaną (to make fat), from *faitaz (fat), from Proto-Indo-European *poid- (to abound in water, milk, or fat), from *poi- (sap, juice). Cognate with German feist (fatted, plump, obese). Related also to Saterland Frisian fat (fat), Dutch vet (fat), German fett (fat, corpulent), Swedish fet (fat, oily, fatty), Icelandic feitur (fat).

AdjectiveEdit

fat (comparative fatter, superlative fattest)

  1. Carrying more fat than usual on one's body; plump; not lean or thin.
    The fat man had trouble getting through the door.
    The fattest pig should yield the most meat.
  2. Thick.
    The fat wallets of the men from the city brought joy to the peddlers.
    • 1908, W[illiam] B[lair] M[orton] Ferguson, Zollenstein, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 29686887 , chapter IV:
      So this was my future home, I thought! [] Backed by towering hills, the but faintly discernible purple line of the French boundary off to the southwest, a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one's dreams.
  3. Bountiful.
  4. Oily; greasy; unctuous; rich; said of food.
  5. (obsolete) Exhibiting the qualities of a fat animal; coarse; heavy; gross; dull; stupid.
  6. Fertile; productive.
    a fat soil;  a fat pasture
  7. Rich; producing a large income; desirable.
    a fat benefice;  a fat office;  a fat job
    • Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)
      now parson of Troston, a fat living in Suffolk
  8. Abounding in riches; affluent; fortunate.
    • Jonathan Swift (1667–1745)
      persons grown fat and wealthy by long impostures
  9. (dated, printing) Of a character which enables the compositor to make large wages; said of matter containing blank, cuts, or many leads, etc.
    a fat take;  a fat page
  10. Alternative form of phat
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

fat (usually uncountable, plural fats)

  1. (uncountable) A specialized animal tissue with a high oil content, used for long-term storage of energy.
  2. (countable) A refined substance chemically resembling the oils in animal fat.
  3. That part of an organization deemed wasteful.
    We need to trim the fat in this company
  4. (slang) An erection.
    I saw Daniel crack a fat.
  5. (golf) A poorly played shot where the ball is struck by the top part of the club head. (see also thin, shank, toe)
  6. The best or richest productions; the best part.
    to live on the fat of the land
  7. (dated, printing) Work containing much blank, or its equivalent, and therefore profitable to the compositor.
SynonymsEdit
  • (animal tissue): adipose tissue, lard (in animals; derogatory slang when used of human fat)
  • (substance chemically resembling the oils in animal fat): grease, lard
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

fat (third-person singular simple present fats, present participle fatting, simple past and past participle fatted)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To make fat; to fatten.
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To become fat; to fatten.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English, from Old English fæt (vat, vessel, jar, cup, casket, division), from Proto-Germanic *fatą (vessel), from Proto-Indo-European *pod- (vessel). Cognate with Dutch vat (barrel, vessel), German Fass (barrel, drum), Swedish fat (barrel, dish, cask). See vat.

NounEdit

fat (plural fats)

  1. (obsolete) A large tub or vessel for water, wine, or other liquids; a cistern.
    • And the floors shall be full of wheat, and the fats shall overflow with wine and oil.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, volume 4, page 429:
      In 1431 New College purchases brewing vessels, under the names of a mash fat, for 6s. 10d., a wort fat for 2s., a 'Gilleding' tub for 2s. 6d., and two tunning barrels at 8d. each, a leaden boiler for 24s., another for 12s., and a great copper beer pot for 13s. 4d.
  2. (obsolete) A dry measure, generally equal to nine bushels.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps related to Latin fatum.

NounEdit

fat m

  1. luck
  2. chance
  3. destiny

Buli (Indonesia)Edit

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fātum.

NounEdit

fat m (uncountable)

  1. fate

ChuukeseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fat

  1. clear, transparent

DutchEdit

NounEdit

fat (m)

  1. dandy, a man obsessed with his looks

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Provençal fat, from Latin fatuus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fat (feminine singular fate, masculine plural fats, feminine plural fates)

  1. conceited

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin factus.

VerbEdit

fat

  1. past participle of

AdjectiveEdit

fat

  1. done, made
  2. ripe

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin factum.

NounEdit

fat m (plural fats)

  1. fact, deed

Related termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fat, from Proto-Germanic *fatą, from Proto-Indo-European *pod-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fat n (genitive singular fats, nominative plural föt)

  1. vat
  2. item of clothing

DeclensionEdit


KowiaiEdit

LadinEdit

NounEdit

fat m (plural fac)

  1. fact

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fat m (feminine singular fata, masculine plural fats, feminine plural fates)

  1. done

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

fat

  1. rafsi of fatne.

Molise CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian fatto.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fat m

  1. story

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Breu, W., Mader Skender, M. B. & Piccoli, G. 2013. Oral texts in Molise Slavic (Italy): Acquaviva Collecroce. In Adamou, E., Breu, W., Drettas, G. & Scholze, L. (eds.). 2013. EuroSlav2010: Elektronische Datenbank bedrohter slavischer Varietäten in nichtslavophonen Ländern Europas – Base de données électronique de variétés slaves menacées dans des pays européens non slavophones. Konstanz: Universität / Paris: Lacito (Internet Publication).

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fat

NounEdit

fat n (definite singular fatet, indefinite plural fat or fater, definite plural fata or fatene)

  1. plate, dish
  2. barrel, drum, cask

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fat

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fat n (definite singular fatet, indefinite plural fat, definite plural fata)

  1. plate, dish
  2. barrel, drum, cask

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *fatą.

NounEdit

fat n

  1. vessel, cup

DeclensionEdit



SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fat, from Proto-Germanic *fatą, from Proto-Indo-European *pod-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fat n

  1. saucer; a small dish
  2. plate (serving dish)
  3. barrel (oil or wine), cask, keg (beer)
  4. barrel; a unit of volume. Usually referring to the oil barrel of 158.9873 liters

DeclensionEdit

Declension of fat 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fat fatet fat faten
Genitive fats fatets fats fatens

Derived termsEdit

IdiomsEdit


TboliEdit

VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Vater or English father.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fat (plural fats)

  1. father

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


YamdenaEdit