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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French subséquent [1], from Latin subsequentis, form of subsequēns, present participle of subsequor (I follow, I succeed).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsʌbsɪkwənt/, /ˈsʌbsəkwənt/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

subsequent (not comparable)

  1. Following in time; coming or being after something else at any time, indefinitely.
    Growth was dampened by a softening of the global economy in 2001, but picked up in the subsequent years due to strong growth in China.
    • 2018 July 31, Julia Carrie Wong, “What is QAnon? Explaining the bizarre rightwing conspiracy theory”, in The Guardian[1]:
      In a thread called “Calm Before the Storm”, and in subsequent posts, Q established his legend as a government insider with top security clearance who knew the truth about a secret struggle for power involving Donald Trump, the “deep state”, Robert Mueller, the Clintons, pedophile rings, and other stuff.
  2. Following in order of place; succeeding.

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TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ subsequent” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.