posterior

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin posterior (that comes or follows after; later, latter).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

posterior (comparative more posterior, superlative most posterior)

  1. (anatomy) Nearer the rear or hind end; nearer the caudal end of the body in quadrupeds or the dorsal end in bipeds.
    Synonyms: back, hinder, rear
    Antonym: anterior
    1. (medicine) Relating to or denoting presentation of a fetus in which the rear or caudal end is nearest the cervix and emerges first at birth.
    2. (botany) Next to, or facing the main stem or axis.
  2. (formal) Following in order or in time.
    Synonym: later
    Antonym: prior

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

posterior (plural posteriors)

  1. (euphemistic, humorous) The hinder parts of the body.
    Synonyms: buttocks; see also Thesaurus:buttocks
  2. (mathematics) The probability that a hypothesis is true (calculated by Bayes' theorem).

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin posterior.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

posterior (masculine and feminine plural posteriors)

  1. posterior (following in order or in time)
    Antonym: anterior
  2. posterior (located behind, or towards the rear of an object)
    Antonym: anterior

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Latin posterior.

AdjectiveEdit

posterior

  1. (anatomy, medicine, dentistry) posterior

Coordinate termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Comparative degree of posterus, from post.

AdjectiveEdit

posterior (neuter posterius, positive posterus); third declension

  1. (of time) coming after, later; next, following
    1. the later of the two, (of persons) the younger
  2. (of space) further to the back, hinder, posterior
  3. later in position or order of mention, latter
  4. less important, secondary, inferior

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension comparative adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative posterior posterius posteriōrēs posteriōra
Genitive posteriōris posteriōrum
Dative posteriōrī posteriōribus
Accusative posteriōrem posterius posteriōrēs posteriōra
Ablative posteriōre posteriōribus
Vocative posterior posterius posteriōrēs posteriōra

NounEdit

posterior m (genitive posteriōris); third declension

  1. (chiefly in the plural) later generations
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative posterior posteriōrēs
Genitive posteriōris posteriōrum
Dative posteriōrī posteriōribus
Accusative posteriōrem posteriōrēs
Ablative posteriōre posteriōribus
Vocative posterior posteriōrēs

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

  • posterior in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • posterior in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • later writers: scriptores aetate posteriores or inferiores

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin posterior.

AdjectiveEdit

posterior m or f (plural posteriores, comparable)

  1. posterior (following in order or in time)
    Synonym: ulterior
  2. posterior (located in the rear)
    Synonym: traseiro
  3. (phonetics) back (produced in the back of the mouth)
    Synonym: traseiro

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • posterior” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French postérieur, from Latin posterior.

AdjectiveEdit

posterior m or n (feminine singular posterioră, masculine plural posteriori, feminine and neuter plural posteriore)

  1. posterior

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin posterior.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /posteˈɾjoɾ/, [pos.t̪eˈɾjoɾ]

AdjectiveEdit

posterior (plural posteriores)

  1. posterior, later
    Antonym: anterior

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit