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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin susurrus (a humming, whispering); reduplication of imitative Proto-Indo-European *swer- (to buzz, hum).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsuː.sə.ɹəs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsu.sə.ɹəs/, /səˈsəɹ.əs/

NounEdit

susurrus (plural susurruses)

  1. (literary) A whispering or rustling sound; a murmur.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of De Quincey to this entry?)
    The soft susurrus and sighs of the branches. — Longfellow.
    • 2000, George R. R. Martin, A Storm of Swords, →ISBN, page 555:
      They heard the Green Fork before they saw it, an endless susurrus, like the growl of some great beast.
    • 2004, Gregory David Roberts, Shantaram: A Novel, →ISBN, page 613:
      I sipped at a drink and smoked cigarettes in a silence so profound that I could hear the susurrus of the blindfold's soft fabric rustle and slip between my fingers.
    • 2007, Patrick Rothfuss, The Name of the Wind, →ISBN, page 301:
      I walked steadily toward the pennant pole amid a sea of susurrus murmurings.
    • 2008, Neil Gaiman, The Graveyard Book, →ISBN, page 262:
      Bod could feel the Sleer listening to Jack's words, could feel a low susurrus of excitement building in the chamber.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Reduplication of imitative Proto-Indo-European *swer- (to buzz, hum). See also Latin surdus, Lithuanian surma (a pipe), Russian свире́ль (svirélʹ, a pipe, reed).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

susurrus m (genitive susurrī); second declension

  1. whisper
  2. murmur

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative susurrus susurrī
Genitive susurrī susurrōrum
Dative susurrō susurrīs
Accusative susurrum susurrōs
Ablative susurrō susurrīs
Vocative susurre susurrī

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit