Contents

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

syllaba ‎(plural syllabas)

  1. syllable

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek συλλαβή ‎(sullabḗ), from σύν ‎(sún, with, together) + λαμβάνω ‎(lambánō, I take).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

syllaba f ‎(genitive syllabae); first declension

  1. syllable
  2. (figuratively, in the plural) poems, verses

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative syllaba syllabae
genitive syllabae syllabārum
dative syllabae syllabīs
accusative syllabam syllabās
ablative syllabā syllabīs
vocative syllaba syllabae

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • syllaba in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • syllaba in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • syllaba in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to lengthen the pronunciation of a syllable or letter: syllabam, litteram producere (opp. corripere) (Quintil. 9. 4. 89)
    • this word ends in a long syllable: haec vox longa syllaba terminatur, in longam syllabam cadit, exit
    • a verbal, petty critic; a caviller: syllabarum auceps
Read in another language