tibicen

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin tībīcen (piper, flautist).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tibicen (plural tibicines)

  1. (chiefly Roman Antiquities, rare) A flute-player; a piper, flautist.
    • 1776, Charles Burney, A General History of Music (1789), volume I, chapter x, page 173:
      When the Lacedaemonians went to battle a Tibicen played soft and soothing music to temper their courage.
    • 1891, Charles A. Ward, Oracles of Nostradamus, “Napoleonic Rule”, page 251:
      But this man’s words are spirit itself, and burn their niche in Time, to last as long as that will. Take two of them: “Soldiers, forty centuries look down upon you!” and again, “Behold the sun of Austerlitz!” When you speak, speak thus to men; such words are deeds; and come not as from one who beateth the air to the pitchpipe of the tibicen Ciceronical, but as the bullet to its butt; speak swordpoints, that press between the joints and marrow.
    • 2012, Timothy J. Moore, Music in Roman Comedy, Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, page 14:
      We have no archaeological evidence that we can with certainty attribute to original performances of Plautus and Terence. We can, however, learn a great deal by examining Greek and later Roman evidence, including artistic portrayals of singers, tibicines, and theatrical performances, and some surviving tibiae.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • NED X, part i (Ti-U; 1st ed., 1926), § 1 (Ti-Tz), page 2/1, “‖Tibicen

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

For *tībiicen, tībia (pipe”, “flute) +‎ -cen

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tībīcen m (genitive tībīcinis); third declension

  1. piper, flautist
  2. (transferred sense) a kind of pillar, support, or prop of a building

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative tībīcen tībīcinēs
Genitive tībīcinis tībīcinum
Dative tībīcinī tībīcinibus
Accusative tībīcinem tībīcinēs
Ablative tībīcine tībīcinibus
Vocative tībīcen tībīcinēs

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: tibicen

ReferencesEdit

  • tibicen in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
  • tibicen in Charlton T. Lewis, An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1891
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden, Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co., 1894
    • to sing to a flute accompaniment: ad tibiam or ad tibicinem canere
  • tibicen in Harry Thurston Peck, editor, Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers, 1898