See also: tíbia

English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin tībia (shin bone, leg).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈtɪbiə/
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪbiə

Noun

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tibia (plural tibias or tibiae)

  1. (anatomy) The inner and usually the larger of the two bones of the leg or hind limb below the knee, the shinbone
  2. (entomology) The second segment from the end of an insect's leg, between the femur and tarsus.
  3. (arachnology) The third segment from the end of an arachnid's leg, between the patella and metatarsus.
  4. A musical instrument of the flute kind, originally made of the leg bone of an animal.
    • 1975, Francis M. Collinson, The bagpipe: the history of a musical instrument, page 188:
      The musician on the left is playing the zampogna, a bagpipe with two chanters and two drones. The zampogna is thought to be the bag-provided descendant of the ancient mouth-blown divergent pipes of the Romans, known as the tibia.

Synonyms

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The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. For synonyms and antonyms you may use the templates {{syn|en|...}} or {{ant|en|...}}.

Derived terms

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Translations

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References

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Basque

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Spanish tibia.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /tibia/, [t̪i.β̞i.a]

Noun

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tibia inan

  1. shin, shinbone

Declension

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Further reading

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French

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin tībia. Compare the inherited doublet tige.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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tibia m (plural tibias)

  1. shin
  2. tibia, shinbone

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Galician

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Etymology

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Attested since 1409 (tiva). Learned borrowing from Latin tībia.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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tibia f (plural tibias)

  1. (anatomy) tibia, shinbone
  2. (archaic) shin
    • 1409, J. L. Pensado Tomé, editor, Tratado de Albeitaria, Santiago de Compostela: Centro Ramón Piñeiro, page 97:
      nota que a dita enfirmidade non enpeeçe aos potros mais prestalles porque daqesto engrosam as tiuas por llos homores que se uoluen aas coixas
      note that this sickness is not detrimental for the foals, but it benefits them because the shins swell because of the humors that return to the thighs

References

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  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “tiua”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • tibia” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.

Italian

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Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin tībia.

Noun

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tibia f (plural tibie)

  1. (anatomy, zoology) tibia, shinbone
  2. (music) an early wind instrument

Derived terms

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Anagrams

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Latin

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Etymology

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Meaning may have evolved from "stalk, reed pipe" to shinbone, the latter being used by Pliny and later authors; flutes were originally made from shinbones. Possibly connected to Ancient Greek σίφων (síphōn, siphon, tube), the irregular forms suggesting a non-Indo-European loan or substrate source, perhaps in *twi-. There are no solid IE cognates outside of the Greek word.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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tībia f (genitive tībiae); first declension

  1. (anatomy) the large shin bone, tibia; leg
  2. (figuratively) a pipe, flute (originally of bone)

Declension

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First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative tībia tībiae
Genitive tībiae tībiārum
Dative tībiae tībiīs
Accusative tībiam tībiās
Ablative tībiā tībiīs
Vocative tībia tībiae

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • French: tige
  • Piedmontese: tija
  • Borrowings:

References

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  • tibia”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tibia”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tibia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • tibia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • instrumental music: nervorum et tibiarum cantus
    • to play the flute: tibias inflare
    • to play the flute: tibiis or tibiā canere
    • to sing to a flute accompaniment: ad tibiam or ad tibicinem canere
  • tibia”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tibia”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890), A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) “tībia”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 619

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French, Latin tībia.

Noun

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tibia f (plural tibii)

  1. tibia, shinbone
    Synonym: (popular) fluier

Declension

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This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Spanish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈtibja/ [ˈt̪i.β̞ja]
  • Rhymes: -ibja
  • Syllabification: ti‧bia

Etymology 1

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From Latin tepida.

Adjective

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tibia

  1. feminine singular of tibio

Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Latin tibia.

Noun

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tibia f (plural tibias)

  1. (anatomy) tibia, shinbone
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Further reading

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