See also: Piper

EnglishEdit

 
piper (playing bagpipes)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English piper, pipere; equivalent to pipe +‎ -er. Piecewise doublet of fifer.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

piper (plural pipers)

  1. A musician who plays a pipe.
  2. A bagpiper.
    • 2020 May 20, “Railway remembers VE Day with a series of tributes”, in Rail, page 15:
      At Glasgow Central and Edinburgh Waverley, the sounding of train horns was followed by a lone piper playing When the Battle's Over.
  3. A baby pigeon.
  4. A common European gurnard (Trigla lyra), having a large head, with prominent nasal projection, and with large, sharp, opercular spines.
  5. A sea urchin (Cidaris cidaris) with very long spines, native to the American and European coasts.
  6. (slang, obsolete) A broken-winded hack horse.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

piper

  1. Archaic form of pepper.

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Greek πιπέρι (pipéri), from Ancient Greek πέπερι (péperi).

NounEdit

piper m

  1. pepper (plant)
  2. pepper (spice)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

piper

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

 
piper (pepper)

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek πέπερι (péperi, pepper), via Middle Persian from an Indo-Aryan source, ultimately from Sanskrit पिप्पलि (pippali, long pepper), itself of unknown origin (perhaps a Dravidian or other substrate language of the Indian subcontinent). The declension was changed to a rhotic-stem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

piper n (genitive piperis); third declension

  1. pepper
    • compiled by 5th century CE, Apicius, De Re Coquinaria 4.12:
      ...Et, cum siccaverint, super aspargis piper tritum et inferes. Ad mensam nemo agnoscet quid manducet.
      ...And, when they get dry, sprinkle mashed pepper on them, and serve. At the table, no one will know what they're eating.

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative piper pipera
Genitive piperis piperum
Dative piperī piperibus
Accusative piper pipera
Ablative pipere piperibus
Vocative piper pipera

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • piper”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • piper”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • piper in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • piper”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • piper”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English pīpere; equivalent to pipe +‎ -er; compare Old Norse pípari and Old High German pfīfari.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

piper (plural pipers)

  1. A piper; one who plays a pipe.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

piper

  1. Alternative form of peper

NormanEdit

VerbEdit

piper

  1. (Jersey, onomatopoeia) to peep

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

piper m or f

  1. indefinite plural of pipe

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

piper f

  1. indefinite plural of pipe

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

piper m

  1. Alternative form of pipor

RomanianEdit

 
piper

EtymologyEdit

From Bulgarian пипе́р (pipér), from Proto-Slavic *pьpьrь, from Latin piper, from Ancient Greek πέπερι (péperi), from Sanskrit पिप्पलि (pippali).

NounEdit

piper m (plural piperi)

  1. pepper (plant)
  2. pepper (spice)

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

piper

  1. present tense of pipa.

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian piper, from Proto-West Germanic *piper, from Latin piper.

NounEdit

piper c (plural pipers, diminutive piperke)

  1. pepper (spice)

Further readingEdit

  • piper”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011