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EtymologyEdit

Diminutive of Old French timbre, from Latin tympanum.

NounEdit

timbrel (plural timbrels)

  1. An ancient percussion instrument rather like a simple tambourine.
    • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
      Hence the soft couch, and many-colour'd robe,
      The timbrel and arch'd dome and costly feast,
      With all th' inventive arts that nurse the soul
      To forms of beauty []
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter II, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      "I ought to arise and go forth with timbrels and with dances; but, do you know, I am not inclined to revels? There has been a little—just a very little bit too much festivity so far …. Not that I don't adore dinners and gossip and dances; not that I do not love to pervade bright and glittering places. []"

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

timbrel (third-person singular simple present timbrels, present participle timbrelling, simple past and past participle timbrelled)

  1. (intransitive) To play the timbrel.
  2. (transitive) To accompany with the sound of the timbrel.
    • Milton
      with timbrelled anthems
    • William Lisle Bowles
      Yet there the timbrelled hymn / Rings to Osiris []

AnagramsEdit