tirocinium

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tirocinium (first military campaign; raw recruit; inexperience; first attempt), from tīro (young soldier, recruit). The word is used in the title of William Cowper's poem on schools ("Tirocinium, or A Review of Schools"; 1784).

NounEdit

tirocinium

  1. Schooling, apprenticeship; novitiate.

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From tiro.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tīrōcinium n (genitive tīrōciniī or tīrōcinī); second declension

  1. apprenticeship, tyrociny
  2. first military service, first campaign, recruitment
  3. (by extension) military inexperience
  4. (metonymically) new recruits, raw forces (collectively)
  5. (figuratively) first attempt (at anything)

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative tīrōcinium tīrōcinia
Genitive tīrōciniī
tīrōcinī1
tīrōciniōrum
Dative tīrōciniō tīrōciniīs
Accusative tīrōcinium tīrōcinia
Ablative tīrōciniō tīrōciniīs
Vocative tīrōcinium tīrōcinia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

DescendantsEdit

  • English: tirocinium

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit