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See also: Tiro, tīro, tirò, and tiró

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tiro (a young soldier, a beginner)

NounEdit

tiro (plural tiros or tiroes)

  1. A newly recruited soldier.
  2. A novice without practical experience.

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

tiro

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tirar

CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

tiro

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of tirar

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish tiro, from tirar (shoot, throw), from Proto-Germanic *teraną (to tear, tear away, rip or snatch off, pull violently, tug), from Proto-Indo-European *derə- (to tear, tear apart).

VerbEdit

tiro

  1. (dated) to shoot, to fire a weapon
  2. (dated) to shoot a goal

SynonymsEdit

  1. tira

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From tirare (to pull).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tiro m (plural tiri)

  1. pull, tug, draught
  2. throw, cast
  3. (sports) shooting
  4. (sports) shot, throw
  5. (of weapons) shot, shooting, firing, range, reach
  6. (military) fire
  7. trick, turn
  8. (of a cigarette) puff
  9. (of a drug) sniff

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

tiro

  1. first-person singular present indicative of tirare

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Etruscan 𐌕𐌉𐌓𐌏 (tiro).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tīrō m (genitive tīrōnis); third declension

  1. (Roman military) recruit
  2. beginner, novice

DeclensionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative tīrō tīrōnēs
Genitive tīrōnis tīrōnum
Dative tīrōnī tīrōnibus
Accusative tīrōnem tīrōnēs
Ablative tīrōne tīrōnibus
Vocative tīrō tīrōnēs

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • tiro in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tiro in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tiro in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • tiro in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be an inexperienced speaker: rudem, tironem ac rudem (opp. exercitatum) esse in dicendo
    • recruits: tirones
  • tiro in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tiro in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  1. ^ Ostler, Ad Infinitum: A Biography of Latin (p. 39)

MaoriEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian, compare Indonesian and Malay tinjau).

VerbEdit

tiro

  1. to observe
  2. to inspect

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From tirar (to remove).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tiro m (plural tiros)

  1. the act of shooting
    Synonym: disparo
  2. a fired shot
  3. shooting firearms as a sport
    Synonym: tiro ao alvo
  4. (sports, figuratively) a very strong kick, throw or hit
  5. (South Brazil) the act of throwing bolas or a lasso towards an animal
  6. (soccer) free kick (kick in which a player may kick the ball without interference)

HolonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

tiro

  1. First-person singular (eu) present indicative of tirar

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

See tirar (to throw). Compare English tier and tirade.

NounEdit

tiro m (plural tiros)

  1. shot (with a gun)
    Synonyms: disparo, balazo, pistoletazo
  2. (soccer) shot
  3. team (of horses)
  4. fix (dose of a drug)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

tiro

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of tirar.