See also: Trant and tränt

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English tranten, from or cognate with Middle Dutch tranten (to step, walk), perhaps ultimately from Proto-Germanic *trent-, *trant- (to walk). Cognate with West Frisian trantsje (to step, step time; dance, jump). Compare also Dutch drentelen (to saunter).

VerbEdit

trant (third-person singular simple present trants, present participle tranting, simple past and past participle tranted)

  1. (intransitive) To walk; go about.
  2. (intransitive) To traffic in an itinerant manner; to peddle.
  3. (intransitive) To turn; play a trick.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English trant, from Middle Dutch trant (a step), from Middle Dutch tranten (to walk). Cognate with Dutch trant (style, manner fashion, mode), Swedish trant (a step).

NounEdit

trant (plural trants)

  1. A turn; trick; stratagem.
Derived termsEdit

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch trant (a step), from tranten (to walk).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

trant m (uncountable)

  1. manner

Derived termsEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

NumeralEdit

trant

  1. thirty

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch trant, from tranten (to walk).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trant (plural trantes) (Late Middle English)

  1. A stratagem, trick or trant; an act of cleverness.
  2. Cleverness, trickiness; a tendency to be tricky.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: trant
  • Scots: tranty

ReferencesEdit


Old PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *trǫtъ.[1]

NounEdit

trant

  1. drone (male bee)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “trǫtъ”, in Derksen - Slavic Inherited Lexicon[1], ordbog.oesteuropastudier.dk, accessed 2 March 2018

WestrobothnianEdit

NounEdit

trant m

  1. little boy

SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

trant

  1. run, walk a little (of children)