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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Compare Welsh twmp, twm.

NounEdit

tump (plural tumps)

  1. (Britain, rare) A mound or hillock.
    • 1974, Guy Davenport, Tatlin!:
      The island was two rocks grey as twilight between which a tump of iron loam ribbed with flint bore a stand of fir and spruce.
    • R. D. Blackmore
      [] winding to the southward, he stopped his little nag short of the crest, and got off and looked ahead of him, from behind a tump of whortles.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ainsworth to this entry?)

VerbEdit

tump (third-person singular simple present tumps, present participle tumping, simple past and past participle tumped)

  1. (transitive) To form a mass of earth or a hillock around.
    to tump teasel

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly from tumpoke.

VerbEdit

tump (third-person singular simple present tumps, present participle tumping, simple past and past participle tumped)

  1. (transitive, Southern US) to bump, knock (usually used with "over", possibly a combination of "tip" and "dump")
    Don't tump that bucket over!
  2. (intransitive, Southern US) To fall over.
  3. (US, dialectal) To draw or drag, as a deer or other animal after it has been killed.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bartlett to this entry?)

Etymology 3Edit

From Penobscot [Term?]; see tumpline for more.

NounEdit

tump (plural tumps)

  1. (uncommon) A tumpline.

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

tump m (genitive singular tumpa, nominative plural tumpanna)

  1. butt, thump

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tump thump dtump
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit