unright

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English unright, unriȝt, unriht, from Old English unriht (wrong, sin, vice, wickedness, evil, injustice, oppression, a wrong act), equivalent to un- (absence of) +‎ right. Cognate with Scots unricht (wrongdoing, injustice), Dutch onrecht (injustice, inequity, wrong), German Unrecht (injustice), Swedish orätt (injustice, wrong, sin).

NounEdit

unright (usually uncountable, plural unrights)

  1. (archaic) That which is not right; wrong; injustice.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English unrighten, from unright (unright, adj.).

VerbEdit

unright (third-person singular simple present unrights, present participle unrighting, simple past and past participle unrighted)

  1. (transitive) To make wrong.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English unright, unriȝt, unriht, from Old English unriht (wrong, unrighteous, wicked, false, unlawful), from Proto-Germanic *unrehtaz (unright), equivalent to un- (not) +‎ right. Cognate with Scots unricht (unfair, unjust), Dutch onrecht (wrong), German unrecht (wrong), Swedish orätt (wrong).

AdjectiveEdit

unright (comparative more unright, superlative most unright)

  1. Not right; unrighteous; unjust; wrong.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gower to this entry?)

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English, from Old English unrihte (wrongly, crookedly, unjustly), equivalent to un- +‎ right.

AdverbEdit

unright (comparative more unright, superlative most unright)

  1. (archaic or obsolete) Wrongly.

AnagramsEdit