EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French usure

VerbEdit

usure (third-person singular simple present usures, present participle usuring, simple past and past participle usured)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To commit usury.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for usure in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia fr

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin ūsūra.

NounEdit

usure f (usually uncountable, plural usures)

  1. (finance) usury
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

user +‎ -ure

NounEdit

usure f (uncountable)

  1. wear and tear, wear
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

usure f

  1. plural of usura

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

ūsūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of ūsūrus

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French usure, from Latin ūsūra.

NounEdit

usure (plural usures)

  1. To lend money in order to make interest; usury.
    • (Can we date this quote by Geoffrey Chaucer and provide title, author's full name, and other details?), Canterbury Tales, "Prioress's Tale"
      foul vsure and lucre of vileynye Hateful to Crist.
  2. Interest on a loan.
  3. A loan.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit