vastity

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

vast +‎ -ity, from Middle French vastité or its source, Latin vastitas.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vastity (countable and uncountable, plural vastities)

  1. (obsolete) Emptiness or desolation.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition I, section 2, member 4, subsection vii:
      Leo Decimus was so much bewailed in Rome after his departure, that [] all good fellowship, peace, mirth, and plenty died with him, tanquam eodem sepulchro cum Leone condita lugebantur; for it was a golden age whilst he lived, but after his decease an iron season succeeded [], wars, plagues, vastity, discontent.
  2. Vastness.