voiture

See also: Voiture and voituré

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French voiture.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

voiture (plural voitures)

  1. A carriage; a vehicle, now chiefly in French contexts.
    • 1748, [Samuel Richardson], “Letter CXIII”, in Clarissa. Or, The History of a Young Lady: [], volume VII, London: [] S[amuel] Richardson; [], OCLC 13631815, page 414:
      The voiture proceeded ſlowly with my Chevalier; []
    • 1751, [Tobias] Smollett, chapter 88, in The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle [], volume III, London: Harrison and Co., [], published 1781, OCLC 316121541:
      Having consulted with my friends, about the safest method of travelling through Flanders, I was persuaded to take places in the public Voiture [] .
    • 1834, Michael Scott, Tom Cringle's Log (volume 1, page 33)
      When the voiture stopped in the village, there seemed to be a nonplusation, to coin a word for the nonce, between my friend and his sisters.
    • 1919, Ronald Firbank, Valmouth, Duckworth, hardback edition, page 101
      As in a stupor, forging headlong forward she was overtaken in the vicinity of Valopolis by the evening voiture of Madame Mimosa, the lady's monogram, "Kiki," wreathed in true-love-knots, emblazoning triply the doors and rear.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French veiture, from Latin vectūra, from the verb vehō (I carry, I bear).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vwa.tyʁ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

voiture f (plural voitures)

  1. car (motorized vehicle)
    Synonym: (Quebec) char
  2. (historical) car (wheeled vehicle usually pulled by a horse)
  3. car (wagon)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit