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EtymologyEdit

From Japanese 侘び.

NounEdit

wabi (uncountable)

  1. (Zen Buddhism) A quality of simple or solitary beauty, especially as expressed in various forms of Japanese art or culture.
    • 1962, Philip K. Dick, The Man in the High Castle, in Four Novels of the 1960s, Library of America 2007, p. 94:
      A lamp here, table, bookcase, print on the wall. The incredible Japanese sense of wabi.
    • 1998, V. Dixon Morris, translating Sen Sōshitsu XV, The Japanese Way of Tea, p. 146:
      One of these changes would be the further refinement of the concept of wabi as an aesthetic ideal, and that was to be the work of Takeno Jōō, under whom the Way of Tea would mature.

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

wabi

  1. Rōmaji transcription of わび

KouEdit

NounEdit

wabi

  1. arm

Further readingEdit

  • Johannes A. Z'Graggen, The Madang-Adelbert Range Sub-Phylum (1975), page 602 (as Sinsauru and Asas)
  • Johannes A. Z'graggen, A Comparative Word list of the Rai Coast Languages, Madang Province, Papua New Guinea, Pacific Linguistics (1980)

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

wabi

  1. third-person singular present of wabić