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See also: Arm, ARM, Arms, ärm, Ärm, and Arm.

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English arm, from Old English earm (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (a fitting, joint), a suffixed form of *h₂er- (to join, fit together).

NounEdit

arm (plural arms)

  1. The portion of the upper human appendage, from the shoulder to the wrist and sometimes including the hand.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, in The China Governess[1]:
      When Timothy and Julia hurried up the staircase to the bedroom floor, where a considerable commotion was taking place, Tim took Barry Leach with him. He had him gripped firmly by the arm, since he felt it was not safe to let him loose, and he had no immediate idea what to do with him.
    She stood with her right arm extended and her palm forward to indicate “Stop!”
  2. (anatomy) The extended portion of the upper limb, from the shoulder to the elbow.
    The arm and forearm are parts of the upper limb in the human body.
  3. A limb, or locomotive or prehensile organ, of an invertebrate animal.
    the arms of an octopus
  4. A long, narrow, more or less rigid part of an object extending from the main part or centre of the object, such as the arm of an armchair, a crane, a pair of spectacles or a pair of compasses.
    The robot arm reached out and placed the part on the assembly line.
  5. (geography) A bay or inlet off a main body of water.
    Shelburne Bay is an arm of Lake Champlain.
  6. A branch of an organization.
    the cavalry arm of the military service
  7. (figuratively) Power; might; strength; support.
    the arm of the law
    the secular arm
    • Bible, Isa. lii. 1
      To whom is the arm of the Lord revealed?
  8. (baseball, slang) A pitcher
    • The team needs to sign another arm in the offseason.
  9. (genetics) One of the two parts of a chromosome.
  10. A group of patients in a medical trial.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle arming, simple past and past participle armed) (obsolete)

  1. To take by the arm; to take up in one's arms.
    • Shakespeare
      And make him with our pikes and partisans / A grave: come, arm him.
    • Two N. Kins
      Arm your prize; / I know you will not lose him.
  2. To supply with arms or limbs.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      His shoulders broad and strong, / Armed long and round.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English arm (poor, wretched), from Old English earm (poor, miserable, pitiful, wretched), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (poor, ill).

AdjectiveEdit

arm (comparative armer or more arm, superlative armest or most arm)

  1. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland) Poor; lacking in riches or wealth.
    He's neither poor nor arm.
  2. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland) To be pitied; pitiful; wretched.
ReferencesEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Back-formation from arms, from Middle English armes, from Old French armes, from Latin arma (weapons), from Proto-Indo-European *ar-mo-, a suffixed form of *h₂er- (to fit together), hence ultimately cognate with etymology 1.

NounEdit

arm (plural arms)

  1. (usually used in the plural) A weapon.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      The next thing I laid hold of was a brace of pistols, and as I already had a powder horn and bullets, I felt myself well supplied with arms.
  2. (in the plural) heraldic bearings or insignia
    The Duke's arms were a sable gryphon rampant on an argent field.
Usage notesEdit
  • Capitalized, the word is often used in the names of pubs, taverns and the like.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

arm (third-person singular simple present arms, present participle arming, simple past and past participle armed)

  1. To supply with armour or (later especially) weapons.
  2. To prepare a tool or a weapon for action; to activate.
    Remember to arm an alarm system.
  3. To cover or furnish with a plate, or with whatever will add strength, force, security, or efficiency.
    to arm the hit of a sword; to arm a hook in angling
  4. (figuratively) To furnish with means of defence; to prepare for resistance; to fortify, in a moral sense.
    • Bible, 1 Peter iv. 1
      Arm yourselves [] with the same mind.
  5. To fit (a magnet) with an armature.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit

Most common English words before 1923 in Project Gutenberg: broken · trouble · die · #644: arm · wrong · afraid · merely

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch arm.

NounEdit

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm

CimbrianEdit

NounEdit

arm m (plural èrme)

  1. arm

AdjectiveEdit

arm

  1. poor

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “arm” in Umberto Martello Martalar, Alfonso Bellotto, Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Setti Communi vicentini, 1st edition, 1974.

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse armr (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ar-mo- (arm).

NounEdit

arm c (singular definite armen, plural indefinite arme)

  1. (anatomy) arm
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse armr (arm, poor), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor).

AdjectiveEdit

arm

  1. (dated) poor, not rich
  2. unfortunate, poor

InflectionEdit

Inflection of arm
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular arm 2
Neuter singular armt 2
Plural arme 2
Definite attributive1 arme
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch arm, from Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂(e)rmos (a fitting, joint), a suffixed form of *h₂er- (to join, fit together). Cognate to Avestan 𐬀𐬭𐬨𐬀 (arma) and Old Persian [script needed] (arma).

NounEdit

arm m (plural armen, diminutive armpje n)

  1. (anatomy) arm
    Iemand kneep in mijn arm.
    Someone pinched my arm.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch arm, from Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erH- (to be sparse).

AdjectiveEdit

arm (comparative armer, superlative armst)

  1. poor (not rich)
    'arme landenpoor countries
  2. poor (unfortunate)
    arme stakker…poor soul…
InflectionEdit
Inflection of arm
uninflected arm
inflected arme
comparative armer
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial arm armer het armst
het armste
indefinite m./f. sing. arme armere armste
n. sing. arm armer armste
plural arme armere armste
definite arme armere armste
partitive arms armers
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *arwaz. Cognate to Finnish arpi. arm is an irregular variant of the root; the expected arb can be seen in dialects.

NounEdit

arm (genitive armi, partitive armi)

  1. scar

DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Most likely derived from armas. Cognate to Votic armo (grace, mercy).

NounEdit

arm (genitive armu, partitive armu)

  1. mercy

DeclensionEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erH- (to be sparse).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

arm (comparative ärmer, superlative am ärmsten)

  1. poor (having little money)
  2. poor (to be pitied)
    arm dran sein = to have bad luck
    lieber arm dran als Arm ab - better to have poor luck than to have no more arm (language game)
  3. low (having a small amount)

AntonymsEdit

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • arm in Duden online

IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

arm

  1. indefinite accusative singular of armur

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish arm n (armour, battle-equipment, panoply; weapon; army), from Latin arma.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arm m (genitive singular airm, nominative plural airm)

  1. weapon; implement, tool
  2. (collective) arms
  3. army

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
arm n-arm harm t-arm
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


Jersey DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate to Dutch arm (poor). Compare German arm (poor).

AdjectiveEdit

arm

  1. poor
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      Hai waz nît tevrêde täus en dârkîs tû râkni arm. []
      He was not content at home and therefore he became poor. []

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish arm n (armour, battle-equipment, panoply; weapon; army), from Latin arma.

NounEdit

arm m (genitive singular arm, plural armyn)

  1. arm, weapon, armament

VerbEdit

arm (verbal noun armal, past participle garmal)

  1. arm

ReferencesEdit

  • arm” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Middle DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

NounEdit

arm m

  1. arm
InflectionEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Dutch arm, from Proto-Germanic *armaz.

AdjectiveEdit

arm

  1. poor, having few possessions
  2. unfortunate, pitiable
InflectionEdit
Adjective
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative Indefinite arm arme arm arme
Definite arme arme
Accusative armen arme arme arme
Genitive arms armer arms armer
Dative armen armer armen armen
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • arm (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • arm (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • arm (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • arm (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English earm (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *arəm- (arm).

NounEdit

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English earm (poor, wretched), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (poor, ill).

AdjectiveEdit

arm

  1. poor
  2. miserable, wretched

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse armr.

AdjectiveEdit

arm (neuter singular armt, definite singular and plural arme)

  1. poor

NounEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

arm m (definite singular armen, indefinite plural armer, definite plural armene)

  1. (anatomy) an arm

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse armr.

AdjectiveEdit

arm (neuter singular armt, definite singular and plural arme)

  1. poor, pitiful (to be pitied)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse armr. Akin to English arm.

NounEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

arm m (definite singular armen, indefinite plural armar, definite plural armane)

  1. (anatomy) an arm

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), whence also Old High German arm, Old Norse armr

NounEdit

arm m

  1. arm

Old High GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

AdjectiveEdit

arm

  1. poor, miserable
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English arm, Old Norse armr.

NounEdit

arm m

  1. (anatomy) arm
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle High German: arm

ReferencesEdit

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer

Old SaxonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

AdjectiveEdit

arm (comparative armoro, superlative armost)

  1. miserable, poor
DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit
  • Low German: arm

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *armaz, whence also Old English earm, Old Norse armr.

NounEdit

arm m

  1. arm
DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit
  • Low German: Arm

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin armus.

NounEdit

arm n (plural armuri)

  1. (chiefly Oltenia) an animal's haunch, or a thigh on a person

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


ScotsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English arm, from Old English earm (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (arm), from Proto-Indo-European *arəm- (arm).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

arm (plural arms)

  1. arm
  2. arm of the sea
  3. bar, beam

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English arm (poor), from Old English earm (poor), from Proto-Germanic *armaz (poor), from Proto-Indo-European *erm- (poor, ill).

AdjectiveEdit

arm (comparative mair arm, superlative maist arm)

  1. poor; wretched
  2. weak; thin; sickly

VerbEdit

arm (third-person singular present arms, present participle armin, past armt, past participle armt)

  1. to crawl about miserably.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English armen (to arm), from Old French armer (to arm), from Latin armō (to arm). More at arm.

VerbEdit

arm (third-person singular present arms, present participle armin, past armt, past participle armt)

  1. to arm, outfit with weapons or armour

Etymology 4Edit

From Old Norse armr (wing of a body).

NounEdit

arm (plural arms)

  1. the tail end of something, especially of fishing line

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish arm n (armour, battle-equipment, panoply; weapon; army), from Latin arma.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

arm m (genitive singular airm, plural airm)

  1. army
  2. arm, weapon

SynonymsEdit

Usage notesEdit
  • Arm is usually used to refer to the entire fighting force of a nation etc, while armailt usually refers to the an "army" involved in a particular battle etc:
    Arm Bhreatainn anns a' Chogadh Mhòr - British Army in the First World War (the armed forces as a whole)
    armailt Bhreatannach ann an Afraga - British Army in Africa

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, ISBN 0 901771 92 9
  • arm” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

SwedishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse armr (arm), from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ermos, *h₂ŕ̥mos.

NounEdit

arm c

  1. (anatomy) arm; the body part
  2. arm; something extending from a body
DeclensionEdit
Declension of arm 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative arm armen armar armarna
Genitive arms armens armars armarnas
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse armr (poor), from Proto-Germanic *armaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ermos, *h₂ŕ̥mos.

AdjectiveEdit

arm

  1. (dated) poor; to be pitied
  2. (dated) poor; with no possessions or money
DeclensionEdit
Inflection of arm
Indefinite/attributive Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular arm armare armast
Neuter singular armt armare armast
Plural arma armare armast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 arme armare armaste
All arma armare armaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in an attributive role.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit