EnglishEdit

 
A yerba bush

EtymologyEdit

From yerba mate.

NounEdit

yerba (usually uncountable, plural yerbas)

  1. Ilex paraguariensis, a species of holly native to southern South America; or the dried leaves and twigs of this plant, used to make the caffeine-rich beverage mate.
    • 1839, Charles Darwin, The Voyage of the Beagle[1]:
      The storehouses at Talcahuano had been burst open, and great bags of cotton, yerba, and other valuable merchandise were scattered on the shore.
    • 1854, P. L. Simmonds, The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom[2]:
      This was the place at which the leaves and small sprigs of the yerba tree, when brought from the woods, were first scorched--fire being set to the logs of wood within it.
    • 1910, Various, Argentina From A British Point Of View[3]:
      His preparations for breakfast are simple, and he is ready to start out after half an hour spent in imbibing a few mates full of yerba infusion.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

yerba f

  1. grass

ReferencesEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin herba.

NounEdit

yerba f (plural yerbes)

  1. grass

IstriotEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin herba.

NounEdit

yerba f

  1. grass

PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish yerba and hierba.

NounEdit

yerba

  1. grass
  2. herb

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin herba, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreH₁- (to grow, become green).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɟ͡ʝerba/, [ˈɟ͡ʝerβa]

NounEdit

yerba f (plural yerbas)

  1. yerba (Ilex paraguaiensis)
  2. Alternative form of hierba
  3. tarantula
Derived termsEdit