younger

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

younger

  1. comparative form of young: more young
    Our neighbor spent his younger years in England.
    Reading this book takes me back to my younger days.

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

younger (plural youngers)

  1. One who is younger than another.
    • 1882, L. H. Apaque, A baker's dozen, page 102:
      Hugh and Charlie also played fairly well, so perhaps it was not wonderful that James, who had always regarded cricket as a childish waste of time, felt rather at a loss, and did not care to display his inferiority to his youngers.
    • 1964, Robert S. Fox, ‎Ronald Lippitt, ‎John E. Lohman, Teaching of Social Science Material in the Elementary School, page 3:
      Youngers did not like olders to be mean and bossy.
    • 1980, Hans Raj Dua, Language use in Himachal Pradesh, page 249:
      First, the use of Hindi is more among the males than among the females irrespective of the interaction with elders, equals or youngers.
    • 1997, M. G. Husain, Changing Indian Society And Status Of Aged, page 162:
      A section of semi-structured interview schedule was also included in the research in order to test if youngers face any problem with elders staying with them.
    • 2008, Janardan Prasad, Panorama of Indian education, page 61:
      So, it is necessary to educate our youngers about economy and,[sic] school and college education can do this easily.
    • 2011, Carroll Anne Sheppard, Nancy Burton Dilliplane, Congregational Connections: Uniting Six Generations in the Church, page 49:
      There are the usual tensions between elders and middles, and between middles and youngers.
    • 2014, Simon Harding, Street Casino: Survival in violent street gangs:
      Half of them youngers didn't know how much these Brixton olders are affiliated with these Peckham olders

AntonymsEdit