zigeuner

See also: Zigeuner

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Zigeuner. See the German entry for further etymological information. Doublet of tzigane.

NounEdit

zigeuner (plural zigeuners)

  1. (offensive) A Gypsy.

Usage notesEdit

Zigeuner is an imprecise exonym probably derived from a Greek word for “untouchable”.[1][2][3] It is considered offensive by many Romani.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 2004, Viorel Achim, The Roma in Romanian History (Bucharest), page 9
  2. ^ 2007, Jean-Pierre Liégeois, Roma In Europe, page 17
  3. ^ 1993, Struggling for Ethnic Identity: The Gypsies of Hungary (published by Human Rights Watch), page 1

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Zigeuner. See the German entry for further etymological information.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌziˈɣøː.nər/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: zi‧geu‧ner
  • Rhymes: -øːnər

NounEdit

zigeuner m (plural zigeuners, diminutive zigeunertje n, feminine zigeunerin)

  1. (sometimes offensive) Gypsy, member of the Roma
  2. (sometimes offensive) gypsy, person who leads a nomadic life

Usage notesEdit

Some people and organizations consider the term offensive, sometimes putting woonwagenbewoner, Roma and Sinti forward as neutral alternatives.[1] Many speakers use the word zigeuner neutrally, and the term is a common word, in both informal and formal contexts, and is also often used by newspapers and state media. The perceived political incorrectness of the term zigeuner also led to equally unsuccessful renaming efforts for zigeunersaus. Some Romani people self-identify using the term zigeuner. Compounds combing the two words are also used, i.e. Roma-zigeuner and Sinti-zigeuner.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: sigeuner
  • West Frisian: sigeuner