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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

zodiac +‎ -al

AdjectiveEdit

zodiacal (comparative more zodiacal, superlative most zodiacal)

  1. (astronomy, astrology) Of or pertaining to the zodiac.
    • 1683, Thomas Browne, “Observations upon Several Plants Mention’d in Scripture” in Certain Miscellany Tracts, London: Charles Mearn, p. 3,[1]
      [] in some passages of the Old Testament they think they discover the Zodiacal course of the Sun []
    • 1912, Mary Webb Artois (translator), Through the Desert by Henryk Sienkiewicz, New York: Benziger Brothers, Chapter 14,[2]
      For several evenings the pale twinkling of the somber zodiacal stars lighted up the west side of the heavens for some time after the sun had set.
    • 1959, Muriel Spark, Memento Mori, New York: New Directions, 2000, Chapter 2,
      She knew by heart everyone’s Zodiacal sign.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

zodiacal (feminine singular zodiacale, masculine plural zodiacaux, feminine plural zodiacales)

  1. zodiacal

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

zodiacal m, f (plural zodiacais)

  1. zodiacal

Related termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From zodíaco +‎ -al.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

zodiacal m, f (plural zodiacais, not comparable)

  1. (astrology) zodiacal (of or pertaining to the zodiac)

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From zodiaco +‎ -al.

AdjectiveEdit

zodiacal (plural zodiacales)

  1. zodiacal

Derived termsEdit