Last modified on 11 September 2014, at 14:37

abbot

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English abbot, abbod, abbed, from Old English abbat, abbad, abbod, from Latin abbās (father), from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbâs), from Aramaic אבא (’abbā, father). Compare abba, abbé.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abbot (plural abbots)

  1. The superior or head of an abbey or monastery. [First attested around the early 12th century.][1][2]
    The newly appointed abbot decided to take a tour of the abbey with the cardinal's emissary.
  2. A layman who received the abbey's revenues, after the closing of the monasteries.

Derived termsEdit

  • abbot of the people: a title formerly given to one of the chief magistrates in Genoa.
  • Abbot of Misrule (or Lord of Misrule), in medieval times, the master of revels, as at Christmas; in Scotland called the Abbot of Unreason

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], ISBN 0550142304), page 2
  2. ^ Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 3
  • Webster 1913

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

abbot c

  1. an abbot

DeclensionEdit

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