Last modified on 23 May 2014, at 21:24

abb

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old English āweb, āb, ōweb, from away + web (warp thread).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abb (plural abbs)

  1. A type of yarn for the warp.
  2. A rough wool from the inferior parts of the fleece, used for the woof or weft. [First attested around 1150 to 1350.][1]
  3. (UK) A filling pick used in weaving.[2]

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 3
  2. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], ISBN 0-87779-101-5), page 2

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish ap, abb, from Latin abbās, abbātis, from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς (abbâs), from Aramaic אבא (’abbā, father).

NounEdit

abb m (genitive abb, plural abbyn)

  1. (Christianity) abbot
    • Abbyr 'abb' dyn gleashagh dty chab.
      • Say 'abbot' without moving your jaw.

Old IrishEdit

NounEdit

abb m

  1. Alternative spelling of ap