Last modified on 20 July 2014, at 12:55

abduction

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Latin abductiō (robbing; abduction), from abdūcō (take or lead away), from ab (away) + dūcō (to lead)[1].

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abduction (plural abductions)

  1. Leading away; a carrying away. [Early 17th century.][2]
  2. (physiology) The act of abducing or abducting; a drawing apart; the movement which separates a limb or other part from the axis, or middle line, of the body. [Mid 17th century.][2]
  3. (logic) A syllogism or form of argument in which the major premise is evident, but the minor is only probable. [Late 17th century.][2]
    • 2005, Ronnie Cann, Ruth Kempson, Lutz Marten, The Dynamics of Language, an Introduction, page 256:
      The significance of such a step is that it is not morphologically triggered: it is a step of abduction, and what is required here is a meta-level process of reasoning.
  4. The wrongful, and usually forcible, carrying off of a human being. [Mid 18th century.][2]
    the abduction of a child

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TranslationsEdit

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], ISBN 0550142304), page 2
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 3

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin abductiō (robbing; abduction), from abdūcō (take or lead away).

NounEdit

abduction f (plural abductions)

  1. (physiology) Abductive movement; abduction.
  2. (logic, computing) Abductive reasoning; abduction.

External linksEdit


InterlinguaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin abductiō (robbing; abduction), from abdūcō (take or lead away).

NounEdit

abduction (plural abductiones)

  1. abduction