Last modified on 17 August 2014, at 09:35

argument

See also: Argument

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Old French, from Latin argumentum (proof, evidence, token, subject, contents), from arguere (to prove, argue); see argue.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɑːɡjʊmənt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɑɹɡjumənt/, /ˈɑɹɡjʊmənt/, /ˈɑɹɡjəmənt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

argument (plural arguments)

  1. A fact or statement used to support a proposition; a reason.
    • Ray
      There is [] no more palpable and convincing argument of the existence of a Deity.
  2. A verbal dispute; a quarrel.
  3. A process of reasoning.
    • John Locke
      The argument is not about things, but names.
  4. (philosophy, logic) A series of propositions organized so that the final proposition is a conclusion which is intended to follow logically from the preceding propositions, which function as premises.
    • 2001, Mark Sainsbury, chapter 1, Logical Forms — An Introduction to Philosophical Logic, edition 2nd, Blackwell Publishing, ISBN 978-0-63121-679-7, §8, page 35:
         Consider the argument:
         15) I am hungry; therefore I am hungry.
      Intuitively this should count as valid. But suppose we thought of the components of arguments as sentences, and suppose we imagine the context shifting between the utterance of the premise and the utterance of the conclusion. Suppose you are hungry and utter the premise, and I am not hungry and utter the conclusion. Then we would have a true premise and a false conclusion, so the argument would not be valid. Clearly we need to avoid such problems, and introducing the notion of a proposition, in the style of this section, is one way of doing so.
  5. (mathematics) The independent variable of a function.
  6. (programming) A value, or reference to a value, passed to a function.
    • 2011 July 20, Edwin Mares, “Propositional Functions”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, accessed on 2012-07-15:
      In ‘The Critic of Arguments’ (1892), Peirce adopts a notion that is even closer to that of a propositional function. There he develops the concept of the ‘rhema’. He says the rhema is like a relative term, but it is not a term. It contains a copula, that is, when joined to the correct number of arguments it produces an assertion. For example, ‘__ is bought by __ from __ for __’ is a four-place rhema. Applying it to four objects a, b, c, and d produces the assertion that a is bought by b from c for d (ibid. 420).
    Parameters are like labeled fillable blanks used to define a function whereas arguments are passed to a function when calling it, filling in those blanks.
  7. (programming) A parameter in a function definition; an actual parameter, as opposed to a formal parameter.
  8. (linguistics) Any of the phrases that bears a syntactic connection to the verb of a clause.
    • 1988, Andrew Radford, chapter 7, Transformational grammar: a first course, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, page 372:
      In numerous works over the past two decades, beginning with the pioneering work of Gruber (1965), Fillmore (1968a), and Jackendoff (1972), it has been argued that each Argument (i.e. Subject or Complement) of a Predicate bears a particular thematic role (alias theta-role, or θ-role to its Predicate), and that the set of thematic functions which Arguments can fulfil are drawn from a highly restricted, finite, universal set.
  9. (astronomy) The quantity on which another quantity in a table depends.
    The altitude is the argument of the refraction.
  10. The subject matter of a discourse, writing, or artistic representation; theme or topic; also, an abstract or summary, as of the contents of a book, chapter, poem.
    • Shakespeare
      You and love are still my argument.
    • Jeffrey
      the abstract or argument of the piece
    • Milton
      [shields] with boastful argument portrayed
  11. Matter for question; business in hand.
    • Shakespeare
      Sheathed their swords for lack of argument.

Usage notesEdit

  • (formal parameter in a function definition): Some authors regard use of "argument" to mean "formal parameter" to be imprecise, preferring that argument refers only to the value that is used to instantiate the parameter at runtime, while parameter refers only to the name in the function definition that will be instantiated.

SynonymsEdit

MeronymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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External linksEdit



CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

argument m

  1. argument (fact or statement used to support a proposition)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin argūmentum, from arguō (prove, argue).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

argument m (plural arguments)

  1. argument
    Quels que soient les arguments que vous avancez, je ne pourrai pas vous croire.

External linksEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /arɡǔment/
  • Hyphenation: ar‧gu‧ment

NounEdit

argùment m (Cyrillic spelling аргу̀мент)

  1. argument (fact or statement used to support a proposition)
  2. (philosophy, logic, mathematics, programming) argument

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

argument n

  1. an argument; a reason
  2. (mathematics) an argument; an independent variable passed to a function
  3. (programming) an argument; a variable passed to a function

DeclensionEdit