Last modified on 20 October 2014, at 03:30

bain

See also: bàin, Bain, and bain-

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bain, bayne, bayn, beyn (direct, prompt), from Old Norse beinn (straight, right, favourable, advantageous, convenient, friendly, fair, keen), from Proto-Germanic *bainaz (straight), from Proto-Indo-European *bhei- (to hit, beat). Cognate with Scots bein, bien (in good condition, pleasant, well-to-do, cosy, well-stocked, pleasant, keen), Icelandic beinn (straight, direct, hospitable), Norwegian bein (straight, direct, easy to deal with). See also bein.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bain (comparative more bain, superlative most bain)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Ready; willing.
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) Direct; near; short; gain.
    That is the bainest way.
  3. (Now chiefly dialectal) Limber; pliant; flexible.

AdverbEdit

bain (comparative more bain, superlative most bain)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Readily; willingly.
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) Nearby; at hand.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English bayne, baine, from Old French bain (bath), from Latin balneum (bath, bath-house).

Alternative formsEdit

  • bane (obsolete)
  • bayne (15th-17th centuries)

NounEdit

bain (plural bains)

  1. (obsolete) A bath.
    • 1485, Syr Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Bk.VIII, Ch.xj:
      THus was sir Tramtryst longe there wel cherysshed / with the kynge and the quene / [] / So vpon a daye / the quene and la beale Isoud made a bayne for syre Tramtryst / And whan he was in his bayne / the quene and Isoud her doughter romed vp & doune in the chamber / and there whyles Gouernail and Heles attendyd vpon Tramtryst

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin balneum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bain m (plural bains)

  1. bath

Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a conflation of Old Irish benaid (beat, strike) and boingid (break, cut).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [bˠanʲ], [bˠɪnʲ]

VerbEdit

bain (present analytic baineann, future analytic bainfidh, verbal noun baint, past participle bainte)

  1. to extract
  2. to cut (hay, turf, flowers, etc.), to mow

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bain bhain mbain
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

RomanschEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin bene.

AdverbEdit

bain

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) well
  2. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) beautifully
  3. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) yes (used to disagree with a negative statement)
Alternative formsEdit
  • (Sursilvan) bein
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) bagn
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

bain m (plural bains)

  1. (Puter, Vallader) farm
Alternative formsEdit
SynonymsEdit