bouter

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French bouter, from Old French bouter (to strike, push), of Germanic origin, from Low Frankish bōtan (to push, strike, beat), from Proto-Germanic *bautaną (to beat), from Proto-Indo-European *bheyə-, *bhau- (to beat, strike, hew). Cognate with Old High German bōzzan (to beat), Old English bēatan (to thrash, beat), Old Norse bauta (to beat). Compare also Spanish botar. More at beat.

VerbEdit

bouter

  1. (dated) to push
  2. (dated) to remove flesh from the skin of an animal
  3. (dated) to pin, to nail

ConjugationEdit

AnagramsEdit


JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French bouter, of Germanic origins.

VerbEdit

bouter

  1. to butt

Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

bouter

  1. to strike; to hit
  2. to place; to put
  3. (reflexive, se bouter) to enter (into)

ConjugationEdit

  • Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Last modified on 7 January 2014, at 15:22