See also: HIT and hít

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia-logo.png
 Hit on Wikipedia

Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hitten (to hit, strike, make contact with), from Old English hittan (to meet with, come upon, fall in with), probably of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse hitta (to strike, meet), from Proto-Germanic *hitjaną (to come upon, find), from Proto-Indo-European *k(')eid- (to fall, fall upon). Cognate with Icelandic hitta (to meet), Danish hitte (to find), Latin caedō (fall), Albanian qit (to hit, throw, pull out, release).

VerbEdit

hit (third-person singular simple present hits, present participle hitting, simple past and past participle hit)

  1. (transitive) To administer a blow to.
    One boy hit the other.
    • 1922-1927, Frank Harris, My Life and Loves
      He tried to hit me but I dodged the blow and went out to plot revenge.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses Episode 15
      BELLO: (Shouts) Good, by the rumping jumping general! That's the best bit of news I heard these six weeks. Here, don't keep me waiting, damn you! (He slaps her face)
      BLOOM: (Whimpers) You're after hitting me. I'll tell []
    • 1934, Robert E. Howard, The Slugger's Game
      I hunted him for half a hour, aiming to learn him to hit a man with a table-leg and then run, but I didn't find him.
  2. (transitive) To come into contact with forcefully and suddenly.
    The ball hit the fence.
    • 1726, Jonathan Swift, Gulliver's Travels, Part II, Chapter V
      a dozen apples, each of them near as large as a Bristol barrel, came tumbling about my ears; one of them hit me on the back as I chanced to stoop, and knocked me down flat on my face.
    • John Locke
      If bodies be extension alone, how can they move and hit one against another?
    • 1882, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Doctor Grimshawe's Secret: A romance
      Meanwhile the street boys kept up a shower of mud balls, many of which hit the Doctor, while the rest were distributed upon his assailants.
  3. (transitive, colloquial) To briefly visit.
    We hit the grocery store on the way to the park.
  4. (transitive, informal) To encounter.
    We hit a lot of traffic coming back from the movies.
    You'll hit some nasty thunderstorms if you descend too late.
  5. (transitive, informal) To reach or achieve.
    We hit Detroit at one in the morning but kept driving through the night.
    The temperature could hit 110° F tomorrow.
    The movie hits theaters in December.
    I hit the jackpot.
    • 2012, August 1. Owen Gibson in Guardian Unlimited, London 2012: rowers Glover and Stanning win Team GB's first gold medal
      And her success with Glover, a product of the National Lottery-funded Sporting Giants talent identification programme, will also spark relief among British officials who were starting to fret a little about hitting their target of equalling fourth in the medal table from Beijing.
  6. (intransitive) To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, often by luck.
    • Shakespeare
      And oft it hits / Where hope is coldest and despair most fits.
    • Jonathan Swift
      Millions miss for one that hits.
  7. (transitive) To affect negatively.
    The economy was hit by a recession.
    The hurricane hit his fishing business hard.
  8. (transitive, slang) To kill a person, usually on the instructions of a third party.
    Hit him tonight and throw the body in the river.
  9. (transitive, card games) In blackjack, to deal a card to.
    Hit me.
  10. (intransitive, baseball) To come up to bat.
    Jones hit for the pitcher.
  11. (transitive, computing, programming) To use; to connect to.
    The external web servers hit DBSRV7, but the internal web server hits DBSRV3.
  12. (transitive, US, slang) To have sex with.
    I'd hit that.
  13. (transitive, US, slang) To inhale an amount of smoke from a narcotic substance, particularly marijuana
    I hit that bong every night after work
  14. To guess; to light upon or discover.
    • Shakespeare
      Thou hast hit it.
  15. (backgammon) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; said of a single unprotected piece on a point.
AntonymsEdit
  • (manage to touch in the right place): miss
Derived termsEdit
Teacup clipart.svg The Tea room(+) is discussing this entry at the moment.
Please come along and share your opinions on this and the other topics being discussed there.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

NounEdit

hit (plural hits)

  1. A blow; a punch; a striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke that touches anything.
    • Dryden
      So he the famed Cilician fencer praised, / And, at each hit, with wonder seems amazed.
    The hit was very slight.
  2. A success, especially in the entertainment industry.
    The band played their hit song to the delight of the fans.
    • Alexander Pope
      What late he called a blessing, now was wit, / And God's good providence, a lucky hit.
    • 2012 February 9, Tasha Robinson, “Film: Review: Chico & Rita”:
      Chico & Rita opens in the modern era, as an aged, weary Chico shines shoes in his native Cuba. Then a song heard on the radio—a hit he wrote and recorded with Rita in their youth—carries him back to 1948 Havana, where they first met.
  3. An attack on a location, person or people.
    1. In the game of Battleship, a correct guess at where one's opponent ship is.
  4. (computing, Internet) The result(s) of a search of a computer system or, for example, the entire Internet using a search engine
  5. (Internet) A measured visit to a web site, a request for a single file from a web server.
    My site received twice as many hits after being listed in a search engine.
  6. An approximately correct answer in a test set.
  7. (baseball) The complete play, when the batter reaches base without the benefit of a walk, error, or fielder’s choice.
    The catcher got a hit to lead off the fifth.
  8. (colloquial) A dose of an illegal or addictive drug.
    Where am I going to get my next hit?
  9. A premeditated murder done for criminal or political purposes.
  10. (dated) A peculiarly apt expression or turn of thought; a phrase which hits the mark.
    a happy hit
  11. A game won at backgammon after the adversary has removed some of his men. It counts for less than a gammon.
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English hit (it), from Old English hit (it), from Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *k'e-, *k'ey- (this, here). Cognate with Dutch het (it). More at it. Note 'it.

PronounEdit

hit (subjective and objective hit, reflexive and intensive hitself, possessive adjective and noun hits)

  1. (dialectal) It.
    • 1922, Philip Gengembre Hubert, The Atlantic monthly, Volume 130:
      But how hit was to come about didn't appear.
    • 1998, Nancy A. Walker, What's so funny?: humor in American culture:
      Now, George, grease it good, an' let hit slide down the hill hits own way.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Alemannic GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German hiutu, a contraction of hiu tagu, a calque on Latin hodie. Cognate with German heute, Dutch heden.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

hit

  1. (Alsatian) today
    Hit isch dr Jean-Pierre so drüri. — Jean-Pierre is so sad today.

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hit m

  1. hit (a success, especially in the entertainment industry)

SynonymsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From hisz (to believe)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hit (plural hitek)

  1. faith, belief

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


LimburgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch, from English hit

NounEdit

hit f

  1. (slang, Dutch) something popular (book, song, band, country)

Usage notesEdit

Slang. Mainly used when speaking Dutch, rather than in real Limburgish. Overall speaking, Limburgish is more conservative, so slaag is more often used.

InflectionEdit

Inflection
Root singular Root plural Diminutive singular Diminutive plural
Nominative hit hits hitje hitjes
Genitive hit hits hitjes hitjes
Locative hittes hitteser hitteske hitteskes
Dative¹²
Accusative¹²
  • Dative and accusative are nowadays obsolete, use nominative instead.
  • The dative got out of use around 1900. As this is a recent loanword, there is no conjugation for it to be found.

Middle DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

hit

  1. Alternative form of het.

Middle EnglishEdit

PronounEdit

hit

  1. it

NorwegianEdit

AdverbEdit

hit

  1. here (to this place)


This Norwegian entry was created from the translations listed at here. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see hit in the Norwegian Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) March 2010


Old DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hit.

PronounEdit

hit

  1. it

DescendantsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hit (this, this one), from Proto-Indo-European *k'e-, *k'ey- (this, here). Cognate with Old Frisian hit (it), Old High German iz (it), Gothic 𐌷𐌹𐍄𐌰 (hita, it). More at .

PronounEdit

hit n (accusative hit, genitive his, dative him)

  1. it

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English hit.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hit m

  1. hit (a success, especially in the entertainment industry)

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English hit.

NounEdit

hit c

  1. (informal) hit; something very popular. (A book, a movie, a song, ...)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Swedish hit, from *+at.

Composed in a similar way: Icelandic hegat and hingað.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

hit (not comparable)

  1. here; to this place, hither
    Jag kom hit igår
    I came here yesterday
AntonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
See alsoEdit
Last modified on 16 April 2014, at 15:56