Last modified on 30 November 2014, at 21:19

caution

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Recorded since 1297, "bail, guarantee, pledge", from Old French "security, surety" itself from Latin cautio, from cautus, the past participle of cavere "to be on one's guard"

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caution (plural cautions)

  1. Precept or warning against evil or danger of any kind; exhortation to wariness; advice; injunction.
    • Shakespeare
      In way of caution I must tell you.
  2. A careful attention to the probable effects of an act, in order that failure or harm may be avoided; prudence in regard to danger; provident care; wariness.
  3. Security; guaranty; bail.
    • Clarendon
      The Parliament would yet give his majesty sufficient caution that the war should be prosecuted.
  4. One who gives rise to attention or astonishment.
    Oh, that boy, he's a caution! He does make me laugh.
  5. A formal warning given as an alternative to prosecution in minor cases.

SynonymsEdit

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Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

caution (third-person singular simple present cautions, present participle cautioning, simple past and past participle cautioned)

  1. (transitive) To warn; to alert, advise that caution is warranted.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cautio, from cautus, the past participle of cavere "to be on one's guard".

NounEdit

caution f (plural cautions)

  1. caution, guaranty, bail
  2. deposit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cautiō, cautiōnem.

NounEdit

caution f (plural cautions)

  1. deposit
  2. (law) bail