Last modified on 25 September 2014, at 19:40

convince

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin convincō (to refute, prove), from con- + vincō (to conquer, to vanquish).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

convince (third-person singular simple present convinces, present participle convincing, simple past and past participle convinced)

  1. To make someone believe, or feel sure about something, especially by using logic, argument or evidence.
    • Atterbury
      Such convincing proofs and assurances of it as might enable them to convince others.
  2. To persuade.
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To overcome, conquer, vanquish.
    • Shakespeare
      His two chamberlains / Will I with wine and wassail so convince / That memory, the warder of the brain, / Shall be a fume.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To confute; to prove wrong.
    • Francis Bacon
      God never wrought miracle to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it.
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To prove guilty; to convict.
    • Bible, John viii. 46
      Which of you convinceth me of sin?
    • Dryden
      Seek not to convince me of a crime / Which I can ne'er repent, nor you can pardon.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

convince

  1. third-person singular present of convincere

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

convince

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of convincō