EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the Latin prefix con-, from cum (with).

PrefixEdit

con-

  1. (non-productive) used with certain words to add a notion similar to those conveyed by with, together, or joint
    congenial, congregation, console, consonant, construct, converge, etc.
  2. (non-productive) used with certain words to intensify their meaning
    confirm
Usage notesEdit

Con- becomes

col- before l: collaborate;
com- before b, m, and p: combat, commit, compel;
cor- before r: correlation;

It can also appear as co-: coexistence, cosine.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Back-formation from conlang, short for "constructed language".

PrefixEdit

con-

  1. attached to certain words to obtain new, informal, subcultural words in which con- conveys a notion of:
    1. constructed, artificial
    2. hypothetical, fictional
    3. related to conlangs, conworlds, etc.
Derived termsEdit

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From preposition cum (with)

PrefixEdit

con-

  1. Used in compounds to indicate a being or bringing together of several objects
    coëo, colloquor, convivor, etc.: colligo, compono, condo, etc.
  2. Used in compounds to indicate the completeness, perfecting of any act, and thus gives intensity to the signification of the simple word
    commaculo, commendo, concito, comminuo, concerpo, concido, convello, etc.

Usage notesEdit

con- is a prefix added to many words to give a sense of with or together. The o is long before s and f, whence cōnspīrō and cōnferō. Before b, p, and m, the n assimilates to m (whence com-). Other forms are co-, col- (used before l), and cor- (used before r).

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin prefix con-, from cum (with).

PrefixEdit

con-

  1. with

Usage notesEdit

Before the letters b or p use the form com-. Sometimes the co- form is used instead.

Derived termsEdit

  • conjuntar
  • coetáneo
  • coacusado
Last modified on 24 March 2014, at 03:54