Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 23:56

cosy

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Scots cosie, from Old Scots colsie, probably of North Germanic origin, related to Norwegian koselig (cosy), Norwegian kose seg (to enjoy oneself). Compare cosh, tosh, tosie.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cosy (comparative cosier, superlative cosiest)

  1. Affording comfort and warmth; snug; social
    • 1785, Robert Burns, Holy Fair - While some are cozie i' the neuk, / An' forming assignations / To meet some day
    • 1836, Charles Dickens, The Pickwick Papers, ch 30 - after Mr. Bob Sawyer had informed him that he meant to be very cosy, and that his friend Ben was to be one of the party, they shook hands and separated

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

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NounEdit

cosy (plural cosies)

  1. A padded or knit covering put on an item to keep it warm, especially a teapot or egg.

Derived termsEdit

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VerbEdit

cosy (third-person singular simple present cosies, present participle cosying, simple past and past participle cosied)

  1. To become snug and comfortable.
  2. To become friendly with.
    He spent all day cosying up to the new boss, hoping for a plum assignment.

AnagramsEdit