Last modified on 8 July 2014, at 07:27

cultivate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin cultivātus, perfect passive participle of cultivō (till, cultivate), from cultīvus (tilled), from Latin cultus, perfect passive participle of colō (till, cultivate), which comes from earlier *quelō, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷel- (to move; to turn (around)). Cognates include Ancient Greek πέλω (pélō) and Sanskrit चरति (cárati). The same Proto-Indo-European root also gave Latin in-quil-īnus (inhabitant) and anculus (servant).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cultivate (third-person singular simple present cultivates, present participle cultivating, simple past and past participle cultivated)

  1. To grow plants, notably crops
    Farmers should cultivate their crops to get a good harvest.
  2. To nurture; to foster; to tend.
    They tried to cultivate an interest in learning among their students.
  3. To turn or stir soil in preparation for planting.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

InterlinguaEdit

ParticipleEdit

cultivate

  1. past participle of cultivar