Last modified on 10 September 2014, at 13:04

eclipse

See also: éclipse and éclipsé

EnglishEdit

An eclipse of the Sun by Saturn, seen from the Cassini orbiter
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EtymologyEdit

From Old French eclipse, from Latin eclīpsis, from Ancient Greek ἔκλειψις (ékleipsis, eclipse), from ἐκλείπω (ekleípō, I abandon, got missing, vanish), from ἐκ (ek, out) and λείπω (leípō, I leave behind).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈklɪps/, /iˈklɪps/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: eclipse

NounEdit

eclipse (plural eclipses)

  1. (astronomy) An alignment of astronomical objects in which a planetary object (for example, the Moon) comes between the Sun and another planetary object (for example, the Earth), resulting in a shadow being cast by the middle planetary object onto the other planetary object.
  2. A seasonal state of plumage in some birds, notably ducks, adopted temporarily after the breeding season and characterised by a dull and scruffy appearance.
  3. Obscurity, decline, downfall
    • Sir Walter Raleigh
      All the posterity of our first parents suffered a perpetual eclipse of spiritual life.
    • Shelley
      As in the soft and sweet eclipse, / When soul meets soul on lovers' lips.
    • 1929, M. Barnard Eldershaw, A House is Built, Chapter VIII, Section ii
      Nor were the wool prospects much better. The pastoral industry, which had weathered the severe depression of the early forties by recourse to boiling down the sheep for their tallow, and was now firmly re-established as the staple industry of the colony, was threatened once more with eclipse.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

eclipse (third-person singular simple present eclipses, present participle eclipsing, simple past and past participle eclipsed)

  1. (transitive) Of astronomical bodies, to cause an eclipse.
    The Moon eclipsed the Sun.
  2. (transitive) To overshadow; to be better or more noticeable than.
    The student’s skills soon eclipsed those of his teacher.
    • Shakespeare
      My joy of liberty is half eclipsed.
  3. (Irish grammar) To undergo eclipsis.

TranslationsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin eclīpsis.

NounEdit

eclipse m (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin eclīpsis.

NounEdit

eclipse f (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse

LatinEdit

NounEdit

eclīpse

  1. ablative singular of eclīpsis

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

eclipse m (oblique plural eclipses, nominative singular eclipses, nominative plural eclipse)

  1. eclipse

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

eclipse m (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

eclipse

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of eclipsar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of eclipsar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of eclipsar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of eclipsar

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin eclīpsis.

NounEdit

eclipse m (plural eclipses)

  1. eclipse
  2. disappearance

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

eclipse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of eclipsar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of eclipsar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of eclipsar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of eclipsar.