fantasy

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French fantasie (fantasy), from Latin phantasia (imagination), from Ancient Greek φαντασία (phantasia, apparition), from φαντάζω (phantazō, to show at the eye or the mind), from φαίνω (phainō, to show in light), from the same root as ϕῶς (phôs, light).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fantasy (plural fantasies)

  1. That which comes from one's imagination.
    • Shakespeare
      Is not this something more than fantasy ?
    • Milton
      A thousand fantasies begin to throng into my memory.
  2. (literature) The literary genre generally dealing with themes of magic and fictive medieval technology.
  3. A fantastical design.
    • Hawthorne
      Embroidered with fantasies and flourishes of gold thread.
  4. (slang) The drug gamma-hydroxybutyric acid.

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

fantasy (third-person singular simple present fantasies, present participle fantasying, simple past and past participle fantasied)

  1. (literary) To fantasize (about)
  2. (obsolete) To have a fancy for; to be pleased with; to like.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cavendish to this entry?)
    • Robynson (More's Utopia)
      Which he doth most fantasy.

See alsoEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

fantasy f

  1. (literature) fantasy (literary genre)
Last modified on 21 February 2014, at 07:04