EnglishEdit

Geta
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EtymologyEdit

From Japanese 下駄 (geta).

NounEdit

geta (plural geta)

  1. A Japanese raised wooden clog, worn with traditional Japanese garments such as the kimono.
    • 1982 July, Robert Dillon, Geta As A Karate Training Tool, Black Belt, page 70,
      The Japanese geta or wooden sandal is a superb, though little-utilized, tool for training in the martial arts. [] The geta are flat, wooden sandals raised on vertical slats.

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse geta (whence also English get), from Proto-Germanic *getaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed- (take, seize). Compare Danish gide, Swedish gitta.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

geta (strong verb, third-person singular past indicative gat, third-person plural past indicative gátum, supine getið)

  1. to be able
  2. to father, to beget
    • Genesis 5:3 (Icelandic, English)
      Adam lifði hundrað og þrjátíu ár. Þá gat hann son í líking sinni, eftir sinni mynd, og nefndi hann Set.
      When Adam had lived 130 years, he had a son in his own likeness, in his own image; and he named him Seth.

ConjugationEdit

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NounEdit

geta f (genitive singular getu, nominative plural getur)

  1. ability

DeclensionEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

geta

  1. rōmaji reading of げた
  2. rōmaji reading of ゲタ

MalayEdit

NounEdit

geta

  1. dais, throne
Last modified on 28 March 2014, at 01:43