Last modified on 6 June 2014, at 04:24

EnglishEdit

Geta
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EtymologyEdit

From Japanese 下駄 (geta).

NounEdit

geta (plural geta)

  1. A Japanese raised wooden clog, worn with traditional Japanese garments such as the kimono.
    • 1982 July, Robert Dillon, Geta As A Karate Training Tool, Black Belt, page 70,
      The Japanese geta or wooden sandal is a superb, though little-utilized, tool for training in the martial arts. [] The geta are flat, wooden sandals raised on vertical slats.

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse geta (whence also English get), from Proto-Germanic *getaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed- (take, seize). Compare Danish gide, Swedish gitta.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

geta (strong verb, third-person singular past indicative gat, third-person plural past indicative gátum, supine getið)

  1. to be able
  2. to father, to beget
    • Genesis 5:3 (Icelandic, English)
      Adam lifði hundrað og þrjátíu ár. Þá gat hann son í líking sinni, eftir sinni mynd, og nefndi hann Set.
      When Adam had lived 130 years, he had a son in his own likeness, in his own image; and he named him Seth.

ConjugationEdit

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NounEdit

geta f (genitive singular getu, nominative plural getur)

  1. ability

DeclensionEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

geta

  1. rōmaji reading of げた
  2. rōmaji reading of ゲタ

MalayEdit

NounEdit

geta

  1. dais, throne