EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English clog (weight attached to the leg of an animal to impede movement)

NounEdit

clog (plural clogs)

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Wikipedia

  1. A type of shoe with an inflexible, often wooden sole sometimes with an open heel.
    Dutch people rarely wear clogs these days.
  2. A blockage.
    The plumber cleared the clog from the drain.
  3. (UK, colloquial) A shoe of any type.
    • 1987, Withnail and I:
      Withnail: I let him in this morning. He lost one of his clogs.
  4. A weight, such as a log or block of wood, attached to a person or animal to hinder motion.
    • Hudibras
      As a dog [] by chance breaks loose, / And quits his clog.
    • Tennyson
      A clog of lead was round my feet.
  5. That which hinders or impedes motion; an encumbrance, restraint, or impediment of any kind.
    • Burke
      All the ancient, honest, juridical principles and institutions of England are so many clogs to check and retard the headlong course of violence and oppression.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

clog (third-person singular simple present clogs, present participle clogging, simple past and past participle clogged)

  1. To block or slow passage through (often with 'up').
    Hair is clogging the drainpipe.
    The roads are clogged up with traffic.
  2. To encumber or load, especially with something that impedes motion; to hamper.
    • Dryden
      The wings of winds were clogged with ice and snow.
  3. To burden; to trammel; to embarrass; to perplex.
    • Addison
      The commodities are clogged with impositions.
    • Shakespeare
      You'll rue the time / That clogs me with this answer.

TranslationsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cloc, from Late Latin clocca (bell) (compare Welsh cloch Cornish clogh, Breton kloc'h), from Proto-Indo-European *kleg- (to cry, sound).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clog m (genitive cloig, nominative plural cloig)

  1. bell
  2. clock

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
clog chlog gclog
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.
Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 12:46