Last modified on 8 December 2014, at 01:04

gate

See also: -gate, gâte, gâté, gåte, and gatě

EnglishEdit

A gate.
English Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia en

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English ġeat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą (hole, opening) (compare Swedish/Dutch gat, Low German Gaat, Gööt), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰed-ye/o (to defecate) (compare Albanian dhjes, Ancient Greek χέζω (khézō), Old Armenian ձետ (jet, tail), Avestan [script needed] (zadah, rump)).

NounEdit

gate (plural gates)

  1. ​A doorlike structure outside a house.
  2. Doorway, opening, or passage in a fence or wall.
  3. Movable barrier.
    The gate in front of the railroad crossing went up after the train had passed.
  4. (computing) A logical pathway made up of switches which turn on or off. Examples are and, or, nand, etc.
  5. (cricket) The gap between a batsman's bat and pad.
    Singh was bowled through the gate, a very disappointing way for a world-class batsman to get out
  6. The amount of money made by selling tickets to a concert or a sports event.
  7. (flow cytometry) A line that separates particle type-clusters on two-dimensional dot plots.
  8. passageway (as in an air terminal) where passengers can embark or disembark.
  9. (electronics) The controlling terminal of a field effect transistor (FET).
  10. In a lock tumbler, the opening for the stump of the bolt to pass through or into.
  11. (metalworking) The channel or opening through which metal is poured into the mould; the ingate.
  12. The waste piece of metal cast in the opening; a sprue or sullage piece. Also written geat and git.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

gate (third-person singular simple present gates, present participle gating, simple past and past participle gated)

  1. To keep something inside by means of a closed gate.
  2. To ground someone.
  3. (biochemistry) To open a closed ion channel.[1]
  4. (transitive) To furnish with a gate.
  5. (transitive) To turn (an image intensifier) on and off selectively as needed, or to avoid damage. See autogating.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse gata, from Proto-Germanic *gatwǭ. Cognate with Danish gade, Swedish gata, German Gasse (lane).

NounEdit

gate (plural gates)

  1. (now Scotland, northern UK) A way, path.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      I was going to be an honest man; but the devil has this very day flung first a lawyer, and then a woman, in my gate.
  2. (obsolete) A journey.
  3. (Northern England) A street; now used especially as a combining form to make the name of a street.
  4. (UK, Scotland, dialect, archaic) manner; gait

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Alberts, Bruce; et al. "Figure 11-21: The gating of ion channels." In: Molecular Biology of the Cell, ed. Senior, Sarah Gibbs. New York: Garland Science, 2002 [cited 18 December 2009]. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bookshelf/br.fcgi?book=mboc4&part=A1986&rendertype=figure&id=A2030.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

NounEdit

gate

  1. plural form of gat

DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English gate, from Old English ġeat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą (hole, opening). Doublette with Dutch gat (hole).

NounEdit

gate m (plural gates, diminutive gatetje n)

  1. airport gate

Etymology 2Edit

From English Watergate.

NounEdit

gate m (plural gates, diminutive gatetje n)

  1. (in compounds) scandal

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French gâter (to spoil).

VerbEdit

gate

  1. spoil

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gata

NounEdit

gate f, m (definite singular gata or gaten, indefinite plural gater, definite plural gatene)

  1. a street

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse gata

NounEdit

gate f (definite singular gata, indefinite plural gater, definite plural gatene)

  1. a street

ReferencesEdit